July 2016 Volumn 17 Issue 193 - Page 50

technique that both a kayak and canoe allow for is a slow floating approach which Kelly’s been successful with since his early days as a river guide. As we slipped into the first pond off the Marsh and Bayou, Kelly stood and intently scanned the pond. I, on the other hand, immediately started blind casting to every inch of marsh edge because it all looked good to me! But Kelly just barely moved the canoe along, allowing us to float across the shal- tight, “Super fine guide work!” With barely any commotion made while putting the first fish in the boat, Kelly pushed us toward the opposite bank where multiple redfish wakes were still obvious. As we bounced through the broken pond edge, we squeezed into a long, skinny bayou about five to six feet wide. “The trick here is to ruin one side; the side you float, and then fish the other. If you try to work both banks, you end up messing up the whole thing,” Kelly “The trick here is to ruin one side; the side you float, and then fish the other. If you try to work both banks, you end up messing up the whole thing,” low flat of the pond. Then Kelly spotted the unmistakable push from a red. “Right there,” he whispered and pointed with a just a head nod a few feet from the boat. While I tried to reel in as quickly as I could, Kelly tossed the good spoon just in front of the V-lined wake. A deep swirl appeared where the spoon hit the water, instantly followed by the highpitched skid of the drag coming 50 July 2016 www.marshandbayou.com instructed. Slow, patient, and quiet was the plan for the day. Kelly barely paddled his canoe; instead he used his double-sided kayak paddle almost as a push pole. He allowed the canoe to drift across shallow flats of the pond without making any noise, “It keeps me from spooking the fish,” he said matter-of-factly. And he’s right, many times we drifted almost on