JLUS Background Report - Page 246

pressure can vary by over one trillion times within the range of human  hearing, a logarithmic loudness scale (i.e. dB scale) is used to present sound  intensity levels in a convenient format.    than 65 dB DNL, and noise sensitive uses such as residential and schools  should not be built under these areas without proper sound mitigation.    It is important to recognize that noise contours as depicted on maps are  intended as a planning tool and do not represent a clear change in noise  threshold at each contour.  Changes in noise levels may not be perceptible  several hundred feet to either side of a particular contour line and can vary  with temperature, humidity, wind, and other environmental factors.  It  should be noted that the DNL contours represent an average sound level  over a 24‐hour period and that individual instances may be louder than the  noise contour in which they are located.  Thus, noise may still cause an  annoyance if it is below 65 dB DNL.  The human ear can detect changes in sound levels of approximately  three dB under normal conditions.  Changes of one to three dB are typically  noticeable under controlled conditions, while changes of less than one dB  are only discernible under controlled, extremely quiet conditions.  A change  of five dB is typically noticeable to the general public in an outdoor  environment. Figure 5.18‐1 summarizes typical weighted sound levels for a  range of indoor and outdoor activities.  Environmental noise fluctuates over time.  While some noise fluctuations  are minor, others can be more substantial.  These fluctuations include  regular and random patterns, how fast the noise fluctuates, and the amount  of variation.  Weather patterns can have a strong effect on how far sound  travels and how loud it is.  Certain weather events can change the  consistency of the air and either cause sound to travel further and be louder  or can reduce the distance at which it can be heard.  Temperature and wind  velocity are examples of factors that can affect sound travel.  Sound tends to  travel further in cold temperatures.  Specific combinations of temperature  and wind direction can create atmospheric refraction, which is when  atmospheric conditions bend and/or focus sound waves towards some areas  and away from others.  When describing noise impacts, it is common to look  at the average noise over an average day.       According to the DOD and the FAA, (Airport Noise Compatibility Planning  [14 CFR Part 150]) 65 dB DNL is defined as the threshold for significant noise  exposure.  Noise exposure within the 55 dB to 65 dB DNL noise contours is  regarded as moderate and land use controls such as the regulation of types  of land uses permitted or the potential use of sound attenuation in buildings  should be considered.  Federal guidelines have been adopted to guide  appropriate development and land use planning for noise contours greater  Page 5.18‐2    Background Report