Jewellery Focus August 2018 - Page 22

TREND-WATCH Melissa Rigby in Residence at Glasgow School of Art. Caitlin’s work explores and researches the colour blue. “Rather than traditional stone settings to bring colour into the work, the lapis lazuli is crushed into a powder, referencing the origins of ultramarine pigment. Wood, jet and jesmonite are hand carved and forging my own tools makes chasing my equivalent of drawing but in metal. I enjoy the unpredictability and imperfections that these processes produce, referencing the nuances and inclusions of the Lapis Lazuli stone. I am passionate about finding alternative methods to progress and rejuvenate ancient techniques and materials.” (www.caitlinhegney.co.uk) This is a year of highly talented graduates in MA Jewellery Design at Central St. Martin’s, and Katharina Kraus is one of them. Her collection combines translucent agate and transparent quartz with many clear coloured stones and gold plated sterling silver. Using traditional techniques and tools to explore the natural light reflection in gemstones by placing different colours and light reflection styles in juxtaposition, Katharina creates visual effects that move and change when worn, each gemstone angled with or away from the body. The hand- carved stones contrast with the precise visual effects of regularly cut gems, and echo the angled architectural lines of cityscapes. Katharina has been selected as a 22 JEWELLERY FOCUS Pippa Small Bright Young Gem for 2018 at IJL. (www.kathykraus.com) Jacqueline Payne is an Australian-born, London-based jewellery designer, a CSM MA graduate, who is passionate about sourcing unique and rare stones, many of which originate in her native western Australia. Her first collection, Chroma, is a modern and luxurious take on statement jewellery. The stones are sourced from artisanal miners - Peanut Wood, from the Cretaceous Age, is approximately 120 million Caitlin Hegney years old and Mookaite is a multi- coloured stone, found in Mooka Creek, 600 miles north of Perth. They are carved in London by an artisanal lapidarist working alongside Jacqueline to accentuate the natural beauty of the stones from multiple angles and curves. (www.jacquelinepayne.com) Neung Wi Kim is a contemporary jewellery designer from South Korea, and after training, working and winning awards there has graduated with an MA from CSM. Her collection, Samrimryok, means the immersing of self with nature, and especially seashores, as the beach is a place for relaxation and rejuvenation. Neung Wi has collected a huge variety of pebbles from different beaches – Mongdol in South Korea, Chesil in Dorset, and Brighton. Collecting pebbles from beaches as mementos of happy times is something we all do, and Neung Wi has perfected a way of cutting and polishing the loved pebbles to incorporate them into jewellery, like rings, to wear and treasure forever. Neung Wi Kim is the winner of the Tiffany & Co. Outset Studiomakers Prize 2018, gifting a year’s rent free studio space in London, and participation in an exhibition in the Covent Garden store, from 26 September - 14 October. (www.neungwikimjewellery.co.uk) The fascination with gemstones was evident too in the degree show at the Royal College of Art. Chris Massey, a Californian interior designer moved to Melbourne to study jewellery design, developing his interest in shaping stones at a lapidary club there. Unlike conventional gemstone cutting techniques, his faceting “works intuitively with the stone’s rough exterior to predict how light will refract internally and back to the viewer”. He says: “I titled my work The Character of Stone because I am working individually with each gem, as well as working to help it reveal itself to us. We should call such character the Fifth C (in addition to clarity, cut, carat weight and colour) because it is truly the intrinsic nature of these stones.” (www.conceivedmade.com) ‘‘ Collecting pebbles from beaches as mementos of happy times is something we all do, and Neung Wi has perfected a way of cutting and polishing the loved pebbles to incorporate them into jewellery, like rings, to wear and treasure forever ‘‘ JANET FITCH August 2018 | jewelleryfocus.co.uk