International Wood International Wood 2005 - Page 36

“The quality of the Chilean radiata pine mouldings has improved steadily over the years. We’re a very quality-conscious company, and this product has suited us, and our customers, quite well. ” BRIAN KOETTER 36 IMPORTED WOOD “Imports are certainly playing a bigger part, there’s no question,” says Brian Koetter, vice president of marketing. “They are becoming a bigger part of the mix as the spread increases between what the market is willing to pay and the costs of manu- facturing domestically.” By volume, Koetter’s architectural millwork unit uses the most imported wood – primarily fingerjointed Chilean radiata pine and ultra light fiberboard, purchased already moulded, primed and ready for paint. “We sell approximately 30 different profiles in the Chilean mouldings,” says Koetter. “Our biggest movers are our stock pro- files. We send them our specifications, and they cut the knives and turn around our order usually in 12 weeks. If they’ve already run a particular profile, turnaround drops to about eight weeks. “The quality of these mouldings has improved steadily over the years. We’re a very quality-conscious company. We don’t sell on price alone, so this product has suited us, and our customers, quite well.” Koetter Woodworking entered the window fashions market seven years ago, buying and drying local poplar and domestic basswood to process into two-inch blind slats for interior blind fabricators. “Two-inch wood blinds are a commodity – a tenth of a cent per lineal foot can be a determining factor – so when poplar supplies started to become cost prohibitive we ɹѼ ͔ݽ)]Ёѡͱ̰ЁѡѼѠ͠ѡѼȁ̴)ѽϊdѥ̸]ձɍ͔Ѓ͡Ёѡɗe