International Wood International Wood 2005 - Page 33

mahogany is used on sailboats and yachts; if it can stand up to that, there’s a pretty good chance an entry door is going to hold up for the next 50 or 100 years. “Its weatherability is a main reason the architects like this species, but it also provides them the look they want. We just completed a project where the exterior doors and a matching screened porch were all stain-grade Honduran mahogany, chosen by the architect because the red tone matched the stonework on the home.” Carter Lee also works with other imported species in lesser volumes. “Brazilian cherry, also called jatoba, is mainly a flooring wood for us, along with stair treads, handrails, and other mouldings for stair products. We’re also doing more Ipé decking these days, but the custom millwork in Honduran mahogany is the majority of our millwork business.” Welch says the company’s new president, Dave Carter, considers the mill to be his “secret weapon.” He plans to start marketing its capabilities to draw in more walk-in traffic as well as more high-end builders. The company already works regularly with one of three top builders of high-end homes in the state...which leads us back to the $42,000 entry mentioned at the beginning of the story. “That entry is 12 feet tall, seven feet wide and three inches thick, with carved mouldings. It’s absolutely IW beautiful.” “Its weatherability is a main reason the architects like mahogany, but it also provides them the look they want.” CARTER LEE IMPORTED WOOD 33