INTER-SECTION Volume III - Page 32

| Vivian S. van Heekeren | Site Date Type of Cemetery Status To tal* Adults F F (OP) M M (OP) I and U I and Reference U (OP) Dominican Friary Car ter Lane (PIC87) 13th c. - 1538 AD Monastic N/ A 57 48 12 1 16 – 20 – WORD database, 2015a East Smithfield Black Death Cem e te ry (MIN86) 1348 - 1350 AD Epidemic N/ A 636 420 104 1 189 – 127 – WORD d atabase, 2015a Guildhall Ya rd (GYE92) 1050 - 1150 AD Parish N/ A 68 47 15 – 18 – 14 1 WORD d atabase, 2015a Mer ton Priory (M PY86) 1117 - 1538 AD Monastic N/ A 676 643 53 – 485 – 105 – WORD database, 2015a Saint Saviour Monastery Cemetery, Bermondsey Abb e y (BA84) 1089 - 1538 AD Monastic N/ A 201 200 – – 147 – 53 – WORD d atabase, 2015a Spital Square (NRT85) circa 1200 - 1500 AD Hospi tal N/ A 54 35 8 1 20 – 7 – WORD d atabase, 2015a St Ben e t She rehog (ONE94) 1280 - 1666 AD Parish N/ A 39 24 4 – 8 – 12 – WORD d atabase, 2015a St Mary Graces (MIN86) 1350 - 1540 AD Monastic N/ A 389 283 68 – 136 1 79 – WORD database, 2015a St Mary Spital (SRP98) circa 1120 - 1539 AD Hospital N/ A 5387 4360 1883 2 2237 2 240 – Connell e t al. 2012 7507 6060 2147 To tal Individuals To tal with Osteoporosis 9 3256 5 657 3 1 Table 1a. Synopsis of the Medieval cemeteries (Connell et al. 2012; WORD database, 2015a). Abbreviations: F=female, M=male, I=intermediate, U=unknown, and OP=osteoporosis. *Total is this respect means total individuals analysed. The data for nine Medieval cemeteries was collected for this research. The cemeteries date between 1050 and 1538 AD, with one exception: the Medieval burials from St Benet Sherehog (ONE94) which date to 1666 AD (tab. 1a). Data was also collected for a total of sixteen post-Medieval cemeteries, which date between circa 1540 and 1853 AD (tab. 1b). The distribution of the sites in Greater London The prevalence of osteoporosis at the cemeteries calculated as the CPR will be compared with the results of Roberts and Cox (2003). The ratio p. 30 | VOL III | INTER-SECTION | 2017 visualises the percentage of affected individuals with osteoporosis in relation to the entire excavated population. This approach has its limitations since the outcome of the CPR is applied to the overall population over a certain period of time, which also includes non-analysed adults and subadults. Type 3 of primary osteoporosis, which only occurs to subadults, is rare and secondary osteoporosis accounts for less than 5% of all modern clinical osteoporosis cases (Schultz 2003, 175, 177). Therefore, the statistical analysis will be based on adults only. Research also demonstrates that osteoporosis is related to sex and age and therefore