INTER-SECTION Volume III - Page 21

Suite Central Court- yard Eastern Suite Function of the room Corridor 0 Religious 3 Standard Inscrip - Hunting tion 1 0 Warfare 0 Tribute 0 Un-deter- mined 0 Un-deco- rated 0 U 0 0 16 0 0 0 0 0 Reception room G 13 30 1 0 0 0 0 0 Courtyard Corridor Y Z 0 0 0 10 82 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 Total 4 16 83 10 31 Retiring room H 9 25 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 Storage room J 0 0 11 0 0 0 0 0 11 Bathroom Storage room Storage room Storage room Throne- room Suite P Representations of the King Storage room Bathroom King’s Suite Room I L K M O 0 0 0 0 0 34 34 0 0 0 2 2 14 12 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 36 36 14 12 10 Storage room R 0 0 12 0 0 0 0 0 12 Hall T 0 9 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 Hall Reception room Bathroom Bathroom N S V W 1 1 0 0 15 29 0 0 3 0 11 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18 29 11 9 Retiring room X 0 0 24 0 0 0 0 0 24 Hall F D/ ED/E 0 17 0 0 0 0 16 0 33 Reception room Hall Courtyard B C 19 1 1 18 13 5 0 0 0 2 0 0 Table 1. The amount of wall reliefs and depictions of the king per room. had no direct relation to the function of these rooms and the surrounding suites. As for the religious scenes, these are often only used as a way of decoration. In almost all rooms where religious scenes are situated, the corners are decorated with depictions of the sacred tree. Moreover, genii are often depicted on both sides of a doorway. However, this has been interpreted by Kertai (2014) as a way of directing people through the palace. The removal of the reliefs in the Double-Sided Reception suite is however a major drawback to this research. Since it was also used as a reception suite and narrative scenes were also present, it could have given us more information on the use of these types of reliefs. Furthermore, in several rooms located in the Throneroom Suite (D/ED/D, B and F) the number and type of the reliefs could not be reconstructed. Therefore, only an estimation could be made of the original number of the reliefs. Conclusions and implications This study shows that the wall reliefs had a strong relation to their location in the palace. This is 10 0 0 2 0 12 10 0 2 0 0 0 42 13 19 The images were not only a means of propaganda, but were used in a variety of ways. The reliefs were used to impress the visitors of the palace, to direct people through the palace, to designate the function of a room, to inform its visitors, and lastly to decorate the palace walls. In future research, more attention should be given to the spatial context of wall reliefs. When studying these relief s in isolation, a large amount of information is lost, while their contextualization can help us to better understand their role within human built space. Therefore, more research should be carried out with a greater focus on the images of the reliefs and their relationship to architectural geographies. Acknowledgements First of all, I would like to thank Dr. B.S. Düring for his support and guidance during this research and my studies at Leiden University. Additionally, I would like to thank the Editorial Board and the peer reviewer for their feedback, and my family and friends for their ongoing support. 2017 | INTER-SECTION | VOL III | p.19