INTER-SECTION Volume III - Page 18

| Bo K.H. Schubert | Wall reliefs that are associated with propaganda are expected to be located in the most accessible wings of the palace, where more visitors would be able to see the reliefs. Moreover, Russell (1998, 662) states that rooms. This implies that the reliefs complemented the function of a room. The Northwest Palace The Northwest Palace was situated in Nimrud and was built during the ninth century BCE by Ashurnasirpall II as the royal residence in his newly established capital (Oates and Oates 2001, 36). The palace can be divided into three areas, each having a distinct function: the administrative reliefs were situated in the administrative area or the private area. 2 which all had a distinct function, that were built around the Central Courtyard. Each suite could be reached through a courtyard or corridor, and the suites were also connected through an internal route that originated from the throneroom (Kertai 2014, were adorned with wall reliefs, but the corridors and courtyards were mainly undecorated. The Throneroom Suite and the actual throneroom were accessible through the Throneroom Courtyard. The throneroom was the main reception area of the palace and the largest room in the palace. Its façade was decorated with narrative scenes depicting tributaries, guiding the visitors to the west entrance. The Double-sided Reception Suite was located west of the Central Courtyard and was probably used as a secondary throneroom (Oates and Oates 2001, 55). It was both connected to the Throneroom Courtyard through corridor WZ and the Central Courtyard. Therefore, Kertai (2015, 35) states that visitors who were allowed to enter this secondary throneroom were privileged to go past the throneroom, but were not necessarily allowed to enter the rest of the palace. The Eastern Suite housed a reception room, a rooms or treasuries. Russell (1998, 671-674) has argued that the function of the two bathrooms was to supported by various architectural features. In room L, and possibly also in room I, there was a drain in libation slabs and U-shaped basins were situated in both rooms. Furthermore, rooms L and I were paved with stone slabs and paved bricks, which could be amount of storage rooms is remarkable. These were the most centrally located storage facilities of the palace, and could be related to the rituals that were carried out in this suite. 3 Since this suite stood in direct connection to the Throneroom Suite, it is associated with royal activity (Kertai 2015, 38). The Eastern Suite was less accessible than the Doublesided Reception Suite, as it is not connected to the Throneroom Courtyard. However, both the Eastern Suite and the King’s Suite were accessible through a back entrance connected to corridor P. It seems that this entrance would have been mainly used by the palace staff, and should not be considered as a main entrance. The King’s Suite was connected to the Central Courtyard and the Terrace Courtyard. This suite housed a reception room, a retiring room and a bathroom, and functioned both as a residential and reception suite. Architecturally, it is regarded as the most monumental Residential/Reception suite in the palace. The suite was oriented to the north, which is exhibited in the Throneroom Suite as well. This placement made the king architecturally more visible (Kertai 2015, 210). Because it is directly connected to the private area of the palace, it seems plausible that this suite was exclusively used by the king himself. The wall reliefs Several themes can be recognised looking at the wall reliefs, which can be assigned to distinct categories, namely: hunting scenes, scenes of warfare, bringing of tribute, religious scenes, Standard-Inscription 4 , undecorated and undetermined (Schubert 2016, 24). Most of the reliefs consist of religious scenes which depict genii 5 and the so-called Sacred Tree 6 . With exception of the Double Sided Reception Suite, hunting scenes, scenes of warfare and tributary scenes are only present in the Throneroom Suite, and can also be regarded as narrative scenes. Reliefs were placed next to each other to depict a story, and could have been read like a comic book (Barnett 1970, 14). in these scenes, depicting hunts, warfare and the performance of rituals. Some scenes could be interpreted as historic events, whereas others had a symbolic meaning (Paley 1976, 1). Hence, Ashurnasirpal II had himself displayed in several ways. Russell (1998, 663) therefore argues that the wall reliefs are an expression of his ideologies. Even though each relief bears the Standard-Inscription, many plates are only inscribed with this text. p. 16 | VOL III | INTER-SECTION | 2017 | Bo K.H. Schubert | Wall reliefs that are associated with propaganda are expected to be located in the most accessible wings of the palace, where more visitors would be able to see the reliefs. Moreover, Russell (1998, 662) states that rooms. This implies that the reliefs complemented the function of a room. The Northwest Palace The Northwest Palace was situated in Nimrud and was built during the ninth century BCE by Ashurnasirpall II as the royal residence in his newly established capital (Oates and Oates 2001, 36). The palace can be divided into three areas, each having a distinct function: the administrative reliefs were situated in the administrative area or the private area. 2 which all had a distinct function, that were built around the Central Courtyard. Each suite could be reached through a courtyard or corridor, and the suites were also connected through an internal route that originated from the throneroom (Kertai 2014, were adorned with wall reliefs, but the corridors and courtyards were mainly undecorated. The Throneroom Suite and the actual throneroom were accessible through the Throneroom Courtyard. The throneroom was the main reception area of the palace and the largest room in the palace. Its façade was decorated with narrative scenes depicting tributaries, guiding the visitors to the west entrance. The Double-sided Reception Suite was located west of the Central Courtyard and was probably used as a secondary throneroom (Oates and Oates 2001, 55). It was both connected to the Throneroom Courtyard through corridor WZ and the Central Courtyard. 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