Insights Magazine Volume IX - Page 9

products and services and future enhanced products. These are being organized and made into a plan. Lessons to Learn Organizations of all stages, types and industries – from startup to multigenerational, from privately owned to public sector and not-for-profit, from manufacturers and banks to school districts and health systems – can approach strategic planning with a fresh mindset by following these ground rules. Transitions bring in fresh thinking, new skillsets and different approaches to leadership. Once a transition is complete and a new plan in place, each person in the organization needs to identify their role. With performance management as an important goal of strategic planning, it is critical to cascade the plan to every person and role in the organization to allow individuals to effectively understand their roles in the strategy. Job descriptions and performance reviews that are in line with the organization’s strategy will lead to successful work and outcomes. Many times, strategic plans remain at the top of an organization with executives and upper management. That prevents people throughout the organization from gaining buy-in and feeling involved, and it also misses out on a lot of creative thinking. One of the values of Lean Six Sigma methodology is to get the people who are in the process to design the new process because they know what is wrong with the old one. Similarly with strategic planning, if an organization can identify creative ways to engage people at all levels, management will receive new insightful feedback and critical buy-in. This can be as simple as developing a strategic survey for key individuals throughout the organization to complete. If an organization can identify creative ways to engage people at all levels, management will receive new insightful feedback and critical buy-in. Taking it a step further, an organization can choose some of its high-performing up and comers for a focus group to discuss a couple of the issues they’ve been exploring in their strategic planning. That might be a market or financial analysis, demographics of customers, discussions of competition or what they want in their pipeline of R&D. Companies that are more entrepreneurial give people licenses to be creative and think of new products and services. As seen in the St. Louis Business Journal online edition Julie Eckstein Principal, Advisory Services Brown Smith Wallace 636.754.0233 jeckstein@bswllc.com 7