In Gear | Rotary in Southern New Zealand In Gear - Issue 3 - Page 60

It’s something that’s been around forever, and it’s growing. It’s so, so wrong, everyone should know about it, and everybody should be doing something about it.” Georgia Kerby, Dunedin Rotaractor see it and really connect with organisations first hand, and see the poverty and the issues, I just understand it so much more. “Once you’ve been involved with it, you really can’t ignore it and forget about it now. “I’ve always been interested in heritage and this type of humanitarian work, but I’d never really considered it a career. But just going and doing it, I want it as part of my life, so I’m looking at internships in this area – I want to go back to Thailand and Cambodia, and Michael does as well. “I think it was coming back here and realising I wanted it to be part of my lifestyle … I just can’t ignore it, I just want everything I do to go, in some way, toward alleviating international issues.” Rotary Club of Dunedin Central David Black (team leader) Rotaract Club of Dunedin Georgia Kerby James Heath Lauren hay Lucy Northwood Harry Dennis Rachel Lee Rotary Club of Gisborne Michael Ramsay Rotaract/Rotary Club of Pakuranga Philippa Loseby Khyati Shah Rotaract Club of Norwich (UK) Alexandra Bannon And, Georgia shares David’s vision of Rotary taking a leading role in bringing an end to child sex slavery. Dunedin NRG “What we did is such a tiny little starting place – it’s such a big thing for us personally, but, in terms of Rotary, this should just be the start. This should be a major Rotary project. Non-Rotarian “It’s like polio. It’s something that’s been around forever, and it’s growing. It’s so, so wrong, everyone should know about it, and everybody should be doing something about it. “I think it’s definitely something Rotary needs to take on board.” Shannon Clarke Mark Clarke Abdul Dean (long-time sponsor)