Hello Monaco magazine Spring-Summer 2018 - issue HM03 - Page 59

MONACO TRADITION

The circuit is after all almost unchanged from its birth in 1929 . And that is the magic of it . You take a Principality squashed into 2 square kilometres , perched above the Mediterranean and commandeer its boulevards . No matter the 180-degree hairpin turn approached from a straight run , travelling at top speed . No matter that you approach that hairpin turn from a dark tunnel into blinding sunlight decelerating from full throttle with a 7.5 second burst at 200 km / h , braking hard to 50 km / h . And all the while with only splitseconds to decide if you must overtake an opponent — the only place to do so . Add to that the myriad of turns and gear changes requiring ultimate concentration , finesse , control , and skill — likened by Brazilian driver Nelson Piquet to « riding a bicycle around his living room ». By the time they finish , the race drivers will make almost 5000 gear changes ! Take this jewel in the Mediterranean sun and allow the gods to go crazy — a little rain on the typically sun-bleached track , a storm at sea and you have all the drama of racing in Monaco .

Water hazard !

Did you know the great Fangio narrowly escaped being washed out to sea in his virgin win at Monaco ’ s F1 Grand Prix in 1950 ? It would seem unimaginable , but in the Monaco Grand Prix the unimaginable happens . Take Paul Hawkins , for example . Approaching the chicane at the port , the charming , wellloved Lotus driver must have had his father , a vicar , saying more than a few prayers . A 1965 issue of MotorSport reported : « There was a bit of a furore at the chicane for Hawkins struck the wooden barrier at the entry and spun through the straw bales and over the edge of the quay and into the harbour . The Lotus sank to the bottom and the rugged Australian bobbed to the surface and struck out for shore , while boats went to his rescue ». They say lightning doesn ’ t strike twice , but miracles repeatedly happen in Monaco : the same fate had already struck Alberto Askari in 1955 , when he too ended up in the sea but still managed to come in second . Danger always

© f2 . blick . ch lurks when travelling at 200 km / h only millimetres away from concrete barriers — yet the Monaco circuit ’ s overall safety record is good .
A tight squeeze

Destiny led to this track — destiny

in the form of four personalities .
Antony Noghès and his son Alex wanted a race in Monaco , but their first proposal , with track passing through other European countries , was denied by the Motor Racing authorities who insisted Monaco must have a racetrack within its own border . They had the determination to make it happen against all odds and teamed up with Louis Chiron , the famous Monegasque race driver who saw the potential in the streets of Monaco as a racing jewel . Reigning Prince Louis II wholeheartedly backed the idea of the race and financed its creation . The first Monaco Grand Prix debuted in 1929 . Today , the final curve on the track is known as the « Virage Antony Noghès » after its creator .
The Grand VIPrix

And once you have a race on the

streets of a Mediterranean luxury resort , you have the makings of one of the greatest party venues in earth . Yachts , the perfect place to watch the race and celebrate life , host exclusive parties , like the Force India yacht extravaganza , described as the most awesome party on the planet . During the Grand Prix , celebrities pour into the Principality , outnumbering the famous race drivers . Celebrities can be found on giga-yachts , in the Pits , and in the famous bars and night clubs . It is almost a rite of passage for magnates , film stars and singers to be seen at the Monte-Carlo Grand Prix . Starting with Onassis and Elizabeth Taylor , to today ’ s A-list celebrities George Clooney , Brad Pitt , Will Smith and Leonardo DiCaprio , Monaco bursts at the seams with the « who ’ s who » of the world . Previous years have seen iconic Director George Lucas in the Pits , exclusive yacht parties with Leonardo DiCaprio one year and Cameron Diaz another … Who will we see in 2018 ? Social media is a blur with posts of Pharrell Williams , Justin Bieber and Jennifer Lopez ; famous models ’ Instagrams pulsating with Victoria ’ s Secret divas Bella Hadid , and Adriana Lima — there are more stars than cars ! Experience the magic : go dancing , go to the fashion shows , it is all there for every visitor — beauty on show as only the Monte-Carlo Grand Prix can provide . And , perhaps the ultimate sighting : Royalty — HSH Prince Albert II and Princess Charlene . And no Monaco Grand Prix is complete without sightings of the latest love trysts
Hello Monaco Spring – Summer 2018 / 57
MONACO TRADITION T he circuit is after all al- most unchanged from its birth in 1929. And that is the magic of it. You take a Principality squashed into 2 square kilometres, perched above the Mediterranean and commandeer its boulevards. No matter the 180-degree hairpin turn approached from a straight run, travelling at top speed. No matter that you approach that hairpin turn from a dark tunnel into blind- ing sunlight decelerating from full throttle with a 7.5 second burst at 200 km/h, braking hard to 50 km/h. And all the while with only split- seconds to decide if you must overtake an op- ponent — the only place to do so. Add to that the myriad of turns and gear chang- es requiring ultimate concentration, finesse, control, and skill — likened by Brazilian driver Nelson Piquet to «riding a bicycle around his living room». By the time they finish, the race drivers will make almost 5000 gear changes! Take this jewel in the Mediterranean sun and al- low the gods to go crazy — a little rain on the typically sun-bleached track, a storm at sea and you have all the drama of racing in Monaco. lurks when travelling at 200 km/h only milli- metres away from concrete barriers — yet the Monaco circuit’s overall safety record is good. Water hazard! nd once you have a race on the streets of a Mediterranean luxury resort, you have the XZ[وۙBوHܙX]\\H[Y\[X\ XXH\XXH]HXH[[KB]HYK^\]H\Y\ZHHܘB[XHXX^]Y[K\ܚXY\B[]\YH\HۈH[] \[Hܘ[^ [X]Y\\[H[B\[]K]\[H[[\XH]B\ˈ[X]Y\[H[ۈYK^XX[H][[H[[\\[YXˈ]\[[H]Hو\YH܈XYB]\[H\[[\HY[]B[۝KP\ܘ[^ \[]ۘ\B\[[^X]^[܋^x&\K[\KBX]Y\[ܙHۙ^KY] [Z][[ۘ\P\[[ۘX\]BX[\]H0&\وHܛ ][\YX\]HY[XۚX\X܂[ܙHX\[H]^\]HXX\Y\][ۘ\P\[ۙHYX\[[Y\ۈX^[\)[BYH[ NX[YYXH\H\]›و\[[X[\\[YX\[[BY\^[[\[[&H[Yܘ[\[ B][]XܚXx&\Xܙ]]\[HY BY [YX[H[XH8%\H\H[ܙH\[\H^\Y[HHXYXΈ[B[H\[ۈ]\[\H܂]\H\]܈8%X]]Hۈ\ۛHB[۝KP\ܘ[^[ݚYK[ \\H[[X]HY[ΈX[H8%[H[\RH[[\\[K[[ۘXܘ[^\\]B]]Y[وH]\ݙH\‘Y[HۛHܙX][[\BH\\YZ[\Y]XH[\\[[][ۘX&\‘Hܘ[^[ NML][Y[H[[KBY[XK][H[ۘXܘ[^B[[XY[XH\[˂ZH][][܈^[\K\X[HX[H]Hܝ H\Z[[ BݙY\]\]\]HY\]\BX\^Z[[ܙH[H]^Y\ˈH NMB\YHو[ܔܝ\ܝY0\H\˜H]وH\ܙH]HX[H܈][œXH[\Y\]H[H[[YH][\[ݙ\BYHوH]X^H[[H\\B\[HH[HYY]\[X[ؘYH\XH[X›]܈ܙK[H][\\Yp˂^H^HY[\۸&]ZHXK]Z\X\\X]YH\[[[ۘXΈB[YH]HY[XYHX[\\\H[NMMK[H[Y\[HXH][X[YYYH[Xۙ [\[^\HY]YY^B\[HY\X8%\[B[HܛHو\\ۘ[]Y\˂[۞H0[\ۈ[^[YHXH[[ۘX]Z\\B[ ]X\[Y\]KBX[[Y\\[YYHH[B܈X[]]ܚ]Y\[\Y[ۘX›]\]HHX]X][]ۈܙ\^HYH]\Z[][ۈXZH]\ B[YZ[[[X[YY\]Z\\ۋH[[\[ۙY\]YHXB]\]H[X[[HY]›و[ۘX\HX[][ ZYۚ[[BZ\RHZX\YHXYHYXHقHXH[[[Y]ܙX][ۋH\[ۘXܘ[^X]Y[ NLK^KH[[\HۈHX\ۛۈ\B՚\YH[۞H0Y\]ܙX]܋Hܘ[T^B[[ۘX[$[[Y\ N M