HAPI Guide Summer 2017 - Page 13

HEALTH book, I spent the past year rewriting the entire manuscript. The first step was to remove the characters and situations that I believed were the perpetrators of my misery. But a good story needs conflict, so I had to take a good hard look at the only thing that was consistent throughout – me. I had to dig deep, be vulnerable, and expose my own failings. Though not easy, that change in perspective was the best thing that could have happened, for the book and my life. My writing became more expressive, the emotions more raw, the transformation more profound. Beyond the improvements in my writing, those same shifts began to appear in my life. By changing my perspective and acknowledging my inner turmoil, I had to change, not only the story I had been telling, but the new story I was creating each day. The irony is that in twenty years of coaching other writers, I was finally reaping the benefits that I had seen in their process: by rewriting my story, I discovered the gifts in my experience. I began a process of examining and changing those negative, long-held, and erroneous beliefs. By embracing Though not easy, that change in perspective was the best thing that could have happened, for the book and my life. My writing became more expressive, the emotions more raw, the transformation more profound. Beyond the improvements in my writing, those same shifts began to appear in my life. and accepting my life’s choices, I began to see the gift in each experience. And the biggest gift of all was feeling a deep sense of healing that moved beyond the emotional to a sense of mental and spiritual peace as well. In her book, The Story You Need to Tell: Writing to Heal from Trauma, Illness, or Loss, Sandra Marinella writes: “As we link our narratives, we are changing ourselves. [Christina] Baldwin [in Storycatcher] explains, ‘The self-story requires editing. Editing is a constant process of updating who we think we are and how we spoke about our histories and ourselves.’ And herein we find another piece of our human brain magic. Our brains allow us not only to create our personal story of self but to edit, interpret, and find meaning in what we are creating.” Writing heals and transforms. From cancer to sexual orientation, my clients have shifted their perspectives, found the gift in their struggles, and transformed their lives by writing their story. If you would like to find meaning in your stories, to change your perspective and heal, I invite you to write. Start with journal writing and start with no limits. No one will see your writing unless you 13 | HAPI Guide HEALTH book, I spent the past year rewriting the entire man- uscript. The first step was to remove the characters and situations that I believed were the perpetra- tors of my misery. But a good story needs conflict, so I had to take a good hard look at the only thing that was consistent throughout – me. I had to dig deep, be vulnerable, and expose my own failings. Though not easy, that change in perspective was the best thing that could have happened, for the book and my life. My writing became more expres- sive, the emotions more raw, the transformation more profound. Beyond the improvements in my writing, those same shifts began to appear in my life. By changing my perspective and acknowledg- ing my inner turmoil, I had to change, not only the story I had been telling, but the new story I was cre- ating each day. The irony is that in twenty years of coaching other writers, I was finally reaping the benefits that I had seen in their pro 聉ɕɥѥѽ䰁$̴)ٕɕѡ́䁕ɥ$ɼ)́ᅵѡ͔ѥٔ)ɽ̸́ 䁕Ʌ)Q՝Ё䰁ѡ)ѥٔ)݅́ѡЁѡѡ)ձٔ)ȁѡ)5ɥѥ)ɔɕͥٔѡ)ѥ́ɔɅܰѡ)Ʌ͙ɵѥɔ)ɽչ 役ѡ)ɽٕ́)ɥѥѡ͔ͅ)́͡Ѽȁ)䁱(́!A$ե)ѥ䁱ḛ́$Ѽ͕ѡ)ЁɥѡЁЁ)͕͔݅́ѡЁٕ)役ѡѥѼ͕͔хɤ)Յ́ݕ)%ȁQMѽeԁ9ѼQ]ɥѥѼ)!ɽQɅյ%̰ȁ1̰MɄ5ɥ)ɥѕ胊q́ݔȁɅѥٕ̰ݔɔ)̸͕ٕm ɥѥt ݥmMѽ卅эt)̰aQ͕ѽɕեɕ́ѥѥ)хЁɽ́ѥݡݔѡݔ)ɔ܁ݔЁȁѽɥ́ȴ)͕ٕ̻dɕݔѡȁȁԴ)Ʌ=ȁɅ́܁́ЁѼ)ɕєȁͽѽ䁽͕ЁѼаѕȴ)ɕаݡЁݔɔɕѥt)]ɥѥ́Ʌ͙ɵ̸ɽȁѼ͕)Յɥхѥ䁍́ٔ͡ѕѡȁȴ)ѥٕ̰չѡЁѡȁ՝̰)Ʌ͙ɵѡȁٕ́ɥѥѡȁѽ)%ԁݽձѼȁѽɥ̰)Ѽȁѥٔ$٥є)ѼɥєMхЁݥѠɹɥѥхЁݥѠ)̸9ݥ͕ȁɥѥչ́