Graslander Uitgawe 2: Somer - Page 8

TECHNICAL FERTASA SYMPOSIUM EMPHASISES IMPORTANCE OF SOIL MONITORING The Fertiliser Association of Southern Africa is an organisation that promotes responsible and sustainable soil fertility and plant nutrition through credibility in the industry. Earlier this year it hosted its symposium, which saw stakeholders in the SA fertiliser industry and international speakers discuss the application of the fertiliser guidelines. Fertasa’s CEO, Adam Mostert, took time off during the symposium to answer a few questions about the event and Fertasa’s objectives. L-R: Dr Arjan Reijnevelt, Dr Erik Adriaanse, Dr George Rayment, Dr Pieter Haumann and Cobus Burger. GRASLANDER: The theme of the symposium is soil fertility and plant nutrition, specifically the practical application of the latest fertiliser guidelines. Is the timing of the symposium significant in light of the current drought? ADAM MOSTERT: The symposium is an annual event.This year the focus has been on the latest fertiliser guidelines from the revised Fertiliser Handbook. These guidelines are not specifically for dry years, but can be used after a drought to optimise fertiliser application. We have revised the fertiliser guidelines for maize and these will benefit producers who have been hard hit by the drought. In-depth research has provided us with more insight into the interaction between plants and the soil, making it possible to enhance the fertiliser guidelines. GRASLANDER: What do producers need to be aware of when using fertilisers or soil sampling technology? ADAM MOSTERT: Soil sampling must be done correctly to ensure reliable and useful laboratory analysis. A soil sample must be representative of the soil in the area for which the fertiliser recommendation will be made. In row crops, where fertiliser is placed in bands, the sample must be taken in such a manner that both the fertiliser band in the row and the area between the rows are included in the sample. GRASLANDER: Just how critical is the role of fertiliser in the agriculture growth value chain compared to other inputs, such as water and climate, in general? ADAM MOSTERT: Soil fertility is a critical factor in sustainable and economical food production. Fertiliser application not only replaces any plant nutrients that have been removed by the crop, it also increases the yield and income from a given area of land. Fertiliser is one of the main input costs in grain crop Adam Mostert, CEO Fertasa. production, but it is also a factor that improves the economics of overall crop production. GRASLANDER: How do South African soil sampling companies compare to overseas testing centres? Can our farmers rely on and have confidence in the services available here, or should they be sending their soil abroad for testing? ADAM MOSTERT: Two factors are critical when fertiliser recommendations are based on soil analyses: The accuracy of the laboratory analysis. Agricultural laboratories in South Africa participate in a comprehensive proficiency scheme run by the Agri-Laboratory Association of Southern Africa (AgriLASA). This ensures that all fertiliser, water, soil, plant and animal feed analyses are consistently monitored and evaluated. Local laboratories are therefore reliable for the analyses they offer if these have been certified by AgriLASA. The fertiliser guidelines - which are based on the calibrations of soil analyses and crop responses. Numerous calibration studies have been done on crops in different parts of South Africa. It is difficult, perhaps even impossible, to interpret the analyses done by laboratories that use other analytical techniques. This is because their analyses have not been calibrated in line with plant responses under South African conditions. The Symposium was also addressed by industry experts like Dr George Rayment, a member of the General Division of the Order of Australia and Fertiliser Australia’s Fertcare Champion of the Decade; Dutch fertiliser and soil sampling expert, Dr Arjan Reijneveld; Cobus Burger, Precision Farming Services Business Manager; Dr Pieter E Hauman, former General Manager Grasland Ondernemings; Dr Erik Adriaanse of Sasol and Dr Chris Schmidt of Sidi Pirani. These experts enjoyed an interactive session with the audience during their presentations which are available for downloading from the Fertasa website at http://www.fertasa.co.za/Symposium.html The new Fertiliser Handbook is now available, enquiries can be addressed directly to Fertasa. 6 Graslander Oktober 2016 TECHNICAL FERTASA SYMPOSIUM EMPHASISES IMPORTANCE OF SOIL MONITORING The Fertiliser Association of Southern Africa is an organisation that promotes responsible and sustainable soil fertility and plant nutrition through credibility in the industry. Earlier this year it hosted its symposium, which saw stakeholders in the SA fertiliser industry and international speakers discuss the application of the fertiliser guidelines. Fertasa’s CEO, Adam Mostert, took time off during the symposium to answer a few questions about the event and Fertasa’s objectives. GRASLANDER:    The theme of the symposium is soil fertility and plant nutrition, specifically the practical application of the latest fertiliser guidelines. Is the timing of the symposium significant in light of the current drought? ADAM MOSTERT:    The symposium is an annual event.This year the focus has been on the latest fertiliser guidelines from the revised Fertiliser Handbook. These guidelines are not specifically for dry years, but can be used after a drought to optimise fertiliser application. We have revised the fertiliser guidelines for maize and these will benefit producers who have been hard hit by the drought. In-depth research has provided us with more insight into the interaction between plants and the soil, making it possible to enhance the fertiliser guidelines. GRASLANDER: What do producers need to be aware of when using fertilisers or soil sampling technology? ADAM MOSTERT:     Soil sampling must be done correctly to ensure reliable and useful laboratory analysis. A soil sample must be representative of the soil in the area for which the fertiliser recom­ mendation will be made. In row crops, where fertiliser is placed in bands, the sample must be taken in such a manner that both the fertiliser band in the row and the area between the rows are included in the sample. GRASLANDER:    Just how critical is the role of fertiliser in the agriculture growth value chain compared to other inputs, such as water and climate, in general? ADAM MOSTERT:  Soil fertility is a critical factor in sustainable and economical food production. Fertiliser application not only replaces any plant nutrients that have been removed by the crop, it also increases the yield and income from a given area of land. Fertiliser is one of the main input costs in grain crop L-R: Dr Arjan Reijnevelt, Dr Erik Adriaanse, Dr George Rayment, Dr Pieter Haumann and Cobus Burger. 6 Graslander Oktober 2016 Adam Mostert, CEO Fertasa. production, but it is also a factor that improves the economics of overall crop production. GRASLANDER:   How do South African soil sampling companies compare to overseas testing centres? Can our farmers rely on and have confidence in the ser ٥́مɔȁ͡ձѡ䁉͕)ѡȁͽɽȁѕѥ)45=MQIP胊Qݼѽ́ɔɥѥݡ)ѥ͕ȁɕѥ́ɔ͕ͽ )͕)QɅ䁽ѡɅѽ䁅̸ͥɤ$)ձɅɅѽɥ́MѠɥѥє)ɕͥٔɽ͍ո)ѡɤ1ɅѽͽѥMѡɸ)ɥɥ1MQ́ɕ́ѡЁѥ )͕Ȱ݅ѕȰͽЁ͕)ɔͥѕѱ䁵ѽɕمՅѕ)1Ʌѽɥ́ɔѡɕɔɕȁѡ)͕́ѡ䁽ȁѡ͔ٔѥ)ɥ1M($Qѥ͕ȁե̀ݡɔ͕)ѡɅѥ́ͽ͕́ɽɕ̸͕9յɽ́ɅѥՑ́ٔ)ɽ́ɕЁ́MѠɥ)%Ё́ձаɡٕ́ͥѼѕɕЁѡ͕́䁱Ʌѽɥ́ѡЁ͔)ѡȁѥѕՕ̸Q͔́́ѡ)͕́ٔЁɅѕݥѠ)Ёɕ͕́չȁMѠɥѥ̸)QMͥմ݅́ͼɕ͕䁥)́ȁɝI嵕аȁѡ)Ʌ٥ͥѡ=ɑȁɅ)ѥ͕ȁɅéэɔ ѡ)эѥ͕ȁͽͅа)ɩIٕ ́ ɝȰAɕͥɵ)M٥́ ͥ́5ȁAѕȁ!յ)ɵȁɅ5ȁɅͱ=ɹ)ȁɥɥ͔Mͽȁ ɥ́M)MAɅQ͔́啐ѕɅѥٔ)͕ͥݥѠѡՑɥѡȁɕ͕хѥ)ݡɔمȁݹɽѡх̈́)ݕͥєЁ輽ܹх̈́鄽Mͥմѵ)Q܁ѥ͕ȁ!́܁مէ )ɥ́ɕ͕ɕѱѼх̈́((