gmhTODAY 02 gmhToday May June 2015 - Page 72

As a Morgan Hill native , Julie grew up in and around airplanes . Along with her mother and brother , Julie learned how to fly and earned her pilot ’ s license while still a teenager in high school .

Her parents , Irv and Jan Perlitch , owned and operated the famed Flying Lady restaurant , which graced South County ’ s eastern foothills for more than 20 years . The Flying Lady was reportedly the world ’ s largest restaurant in its heyday and the only one to boast full-sized antique airplanes suspended from the ceiling , surrounded by more than 100 radio-controlled model airplanes gliding along a motorized track . Irv named the restaurant to honor Jan ’ s love of flying , and he incorporated a private airplane runway into the design of the property surrounding the restaurant .
“ The Flying Lady was at the center of my family life from the time I was a teenager , and I grew up thinking that I ’ d always be in the restaurant business ,” Julie said .
Her school years only increased Julie ’ s enthusiasm to return to the family business . She attended Live Oak High School , went on to Gavilan College and then to San José State University where her writing and promotional skills led to a degree in Public Relations .
“ I thought I could put my college degree to work back at the Flying Lady ,” Julie said . “ My dad said he didn ’ t have an opening for a PR person , but he could use a dishwasher !”
Julie worked her way up the ladder in the family business , taking on jobs as a cook , food buyer , waitress , hostess , banquet coordinator and ultimately , handling the marketing and PR .
It was at the Flying Lady that Julie met her future husband and business partner , Pat Belanger , an airline pilot and fighter pilot with the Air National Guard . The couple even tied the knot at the Flying Lady in 1993 in an unforgettable wedding ceremony .
Pat wore his fighter pilot uniform with a tuxedo shirt and cummerbund . Julie was decked out in a white flight suit and scarf . The couple exchanged their vows at the Flying Lady ’ s aircraft museum , took off from the restaurant runway in a vintage 1929 Barnstormer biplane , and were joined in the skies overhead by several other planes piloted by Pat ’ s friends from the Air Guard . During the flight , Julie and Pat exchanged wedding rings and kissed while a video camera inside the cockpit captured the magical moment .
About a year later the Flying Lady closed , and Julie shifted gears to resume her PR career , this time working at a high tech agency in Silicon Valley . As Julie retold the story , her sense of humor and enthusiasm for life came shining through .
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G M H T O D A Y M A G A Z I N E MAY / JUNE 2015 gmhtoday . com
As a Morgan Hill native, Julie grew up in and around airplanes. Along with her mother and brother, Julie learned how to fly and earned her pilot’s license while still a teenager in high school. Her parents, Irv and Jan Perlitch, owned and operated the famed Flying Lady restaurant, which graced South County’s eastern foothills for more than 20 years. The Flying Lady was reportedly the world’s largest restaurant in its heyday and the only one to boast full-sized antique airplanes suspended from the ceiling, surrounded by more than 100 radio-controlled model airplanes gliding along a motorized track. Irv named the restaurant to honor Jan’s love of flying, and he incorporated a private airplane runway into the design of the property surrounding the restaurant. “The Flying Lady was at the center of my family life from the time I was a teenager, and I grew up thinking that I’d always be in the restaurant business,” Julie said. Her school years only increased Julie’s enthusiasm to return to the family business. She attended Live Oak High School, went on to Gavilan College and then to San José State University where her writing and promotional skills led to a degree in Public Relations. “I thought I could put my college degree to work back at the Flying Lady,” Julie said. “My dad said he didn’t have an opening for a PR person, but he could use a dishwasher!” Julie worked her way up the ladder in the family business, taking on jobs as a cook, food buyer, waitress, hostess, banquet coordinator and ultimately, handling the marketing and PR. It was at the Flying Lady that Julie met her future husband and business partner, Pat Belanger, an airline pilot and fighter pilot with the Air National Guard. The couple even tied the knot at the Flying Lady in 1993 in an unforgettable wedding ceremony. Pat wore his fighter pilot uniform with a tuxedo shirt and cummerbund. Julie was decked out in a white flight suit and scarf. The couple exchanged their vows at the Flying Lady’s aircraft museum, took off from the restaurant runway in a vintage 1929 Barnstormer biplane, and were joined in the skies overhead by several other planes piloted by Pat’s friends from the Air Guard. During the flight, Julie and Pat exchanged wedding rings and kissed while a video camera inside the cockpit captured the magical moment. About a year later the Flying Lady closed, and Julie shifted gears to resume her PR career, this time working at a high tech agency in Silicon Valley. As Julie retold the story, her sense of hu [܂[[\X\H܈YH[YH[[Y ̂HHHHHHHBPVH SH MBZ^K