GEMA/HS Dispatch March 2018 Edition - Page 14

Continued from Pg. 13 and restore it exactly as it was before.” Repairing a house may seem like a straightforward process, but according to Steward, restoring a structure like Hofwyl-Broadfield requires a tremendous amount of research and forensic study due to the historic nature of the structure. The workers strive to be “invisible menders,” and if the job is done right, you’ll never notice the repairs. “There are decisions that have to be made about what period to restore the house to, and we have to do paint studies to determine the formulation of paint used in the home at the time period,” said Steward. “You can’t buy the type of paint that was used during the time period the home was constructed, so that means every gallon of paint must be handmade based on the formula determined through the paint study.” “This place is part of Georgia’s cultural identity, so it’s well worth the effort to maintain it so future generations can understand the history that it represents.” -Geoffrey Steward, Owner, International Fine Art Conservation Studios From start to finish, the process is overseen by DNR. Though it may seem like an inordinate amount of detail, according to Steward, the effort is well worth it. “Preserving historic structures allows us to share the spaces and environments of past generations,” he said. “This place is part of Georgia’s cultural identity, so it’s well worth the effort to maintain it so future generations can understand the history that it represents.” Georgia’s history as a cotton producing state is well known, but many people may be unfamiliar with the importance the rice industry played in the state. Hofwyl-Broadfield is one of the last remnants of the rice plantation industry that flourished in coastal Georgia, but its success was a direct result of the back-breaking work done by a slave labor force until the Civil War. Its preservation allows it to serve as a reminder of both the good and bad of Georgia's history, and how far we have come as a state, and a society. Hofwyl-Broadfield Plantation is open to the public for tours Wednesday through Sunday each week. For more information about the plantation, visit http://gastateparks.org/ HofwylBroadfieldPlantation. Tommy Turk, Regional Manager with DNR Parks and Historic Sites Division inspects the water damage caused by Hurricane Irma to the entryway of the Hofwyl- Broadfield Plantation house in Brunswick. Photo by Lisa Rodriguez-Presley. Furnishings and art objects dating back to the 1790’s are displayed throughout the home at Hofwyl- Broadfield Plantation. The artwork in particular, which consists of original oil paintings of generations of the property’s owners is irreplacable. Photo by Lisa Rodriguez-Presley. Centuries-old life aak trees inhabit the property. Their survival was a concern during Hurricane Irma. Photo by Lisa Rodriguez-Presley. 14 DISPATCH