Garuda Indonesia Colours Magazine May 2019 - Page 101

Travel / Tasikmalaya 3 1. From downtown Tasikmalaya, it takes around one hour to drive to the lush beauty of the Taraju Tea Estate. 2. A local casts his net at Situ Gede Lake. 3. The village chief of Parentas serves Arabica coffee from his estate. 4. The children of Cibuniasih village are very cheerful. 4  e fog slowly lifts, revealing Th the green crater and a black-sand island. A waterfall tumbles into the crater from the edge. 2 morning air from the opposite side. The sun is quite high when the fog slowly lifts, revealing the green crater and a black-sand island. A waterfall tumbles into the crater from the edge. I feel like going down to get closer to the crater – there is no smoke or sulphurous smell – but for safety reasons, visitors are not permitted to get any nearer. I am content to sit quietly, enjoying the warmth of the morning sun and the spectacular view. Since the advent of social media, the type of tourism that has been on the rise in Tasikmalaya is ‘curug tourism’; curug means ‘waterfall’ in the Sundanese language. “There are dozens of Instagrammable waterfalls in Tasik,” explains Suci, my millennial guide. “My favourite is Ciparay waterfall.” Naturally, the waterfall is the next stop – but it is no easy feat getting there. Situated near Parentas village, 30km from Tasikmalaya City, our destination takes over two hours to reach because the final 6km leg of the uphill road is in terrible condition. However, the journey is well worth it. From the top of the hill, Ciparay waterfall – also called Curug Kembar (Twins waterfall) because there are two flows – 99