Franchise Update Magazine Issue II, 2017 - Page 15

instead of being reactive to franchise leads , we proactively go into markets with open territories and have events where we present the franchise opportunity to prospective franchisees . We use a multi-channel marketing approach to drive interest in the events . We include the existing local franchisees in these events for validation and give them an opportunity to get to know their potential colleagues . This process is helping build a culture of franchisees who embrace the growth of the system . While I ’ m admittedly a student of franchising , I ’ ve been in the property restoration industry for more than two decades . I make it a priority to make myself accessible to franchisees . They all have my cell number and can reach out to me with questions about everything from locking in an account to billing for a large commercial loss and collecting on a delinquent account .

Describe your leadership style . I believe strongly in servant leadership . When working with my team , I ask them : “ What do you need that I ’ ll be able to help you with so that your team can succeed ?” I instill confidence in the people I ’ m leading . I hire the best leaders and managers I can find , and then I serve them .
What has inspired your leadership style ? Many people and experiences have contributed to the way I approach leadership . One person who had a great influence was Jack Welch , former chairman and CEO of General Electric , who later authored several business books . He believed in recruiting the best talent and empowering them to lead their teams , set their own goals , while at the same time holding them accountable . I was inspired by his ability to achieve results across such a huge , multinational company with multiple divisions , and the culture that was driven from the top down to the entire organization .

What is your biggest leadership challenge ? Adjusting to the process and time it takes to enact change within a franchise organization . I ’ ve served as CEO for various privately owned companies over the past 20 years . In those roles , I ’ ve made decisions to make changes and had the ability to make change immediately . As a franchisor , you can ’ t just make a decision and mandate it across the board . It requires consensus and education to earn the critical buy-in of the franchisees . I ’ m learning to appreciate this process . We listen closely to our franchise owners . What ’ s important to them has a ceoprofile

What does your management team look like ? It ’ s composed of experienced , talented winners who respond well to sersignificant impact on how we make key strategic decisions .
How do you transmit your culture from your office to front-line employees ? Our president , Steve White , has done a great job of building a strong culture . Before Frank Torre and I bought the company , Steve had already set a solid foundation focused on serving our franchise owners . He went out and met most of the owners face to face to learn their challenges . In doing so , he built trust in the company leadership . I focus on reinforcing the great work Steve has done and raising the bar for relentless customer service from our support team ( HQ ) to our franchise owners . If a franchisee needs support , we can and are willing to get someone to their location in a matter of hours . We exist to serve our franchise owners !
Where is the best place to prepare for leadership : an MBA school or OTJ ? I always wanted to get my MBA and thought I would go back to school . One of my mentors , Ken Maddox , taught me something when I was in my early 20s that I apply in my own life and career to this day and teach to anyone who will listen . He told me three factors should influence decisions surrounding your professional future : learning , earning , and giving . Early in your career , most of your decisions should be based on learning . The priority is to fill your toolbox with tools . While earning will always be a concern , you should ask yourself , “ Where am I going to learn the most ? Where can I gain the tools for my toolbox that will be beneficial later in my career ?” You will likely have to sacrifice the earning early on in favor of the learning . If you invested the lion ’ s share of the first part of your career in learning , you ’ ll have a significant amount of earning potential in your toolbox by the time you reach your 40s . Your career decisions in the next two decades can then be shifted to focus on earning , then learning and giving . Then , once you ’ re near retirement , your career priorities should shift toward giving , learning , and earning , in that order . Without this advice , I wouldn ’ t have had the confidence to be on the path I ’ m on now . My second job after college , I took a $ 40,000 salary in Nebraska instead of an $ 80,000 salary in New York City . Why ? I believed I would learn more working in a smaller , privately held company for a selfmade entrepreneur than for a Fortune 500 company . The level of learning was beyond measure . It inspired me to have the confidence to purchase my own company ( Rocky Mountain Catastrophe ) at 27 . This company became the platform for Belfor USA , where as CEO I drove revenues from $ 35 million to $ 400 million in just eight years , making it the market leader in North America . I wouldn ’ t be where I am now had I taken the higher-paying job in New York !
Are tough decisions best taken by one person ? How do you make tough decisions ? I have a 50 / 50 partner , so I don ’ t make any decision without involving him and vice versa . I believe in collecting as much information from the stakeholders as possible . You have to listen and keep your finger on the pulse of what ’ s important to the team . People respect strong leadership ; they lose respect when they think their leader isn ’ t in tune with their opinions .
Do you want to be liked or respected ? Respected . I ’ m not about winning a popularity contest . I ’ m focused on doing the right thing , but at a tempo much faster than most people are accustomed to .
Advice to CEO wannabes : The key to power is not using it . Titles don ’ t matter . In an organization , people know who has the personal power . You should focus on building a team of people who know you ’ ll take a bullet for them . Only then will they reciprocate . At that point , it doesn ’ t matter what your title is because you ’ ll have personal power .
Management
Describe your management style : You have to trust your team and your people . You have to give them a long leash and the true ability to run with it . When you do so , you let them spread their wings and accomplish at a higher level than maybe they would have in a more restricted environment . I set high expectations . I like to use this analogy : If you ’ ve ever been to a dog track , you ’ ll notice that to get the greyhounds to run fast there ’ s always a rabbit running ahead of them at a faster pace . In my work ethic , I lead without asking anyone on my team to do anything that I ’ m not already setting the pace for , at a higher level . Then , it ’ s a matter of envisioning that I ’ m serving them . They know that they can call me and I ’ ll be able to help them . You have to let them run — and be available to help them when needed .
Franchiseupdate ISSUE II , 2017 13
ceoprofile instead of being reactive to franchise leads, we proactively go into markets with open territories and have events where we pres- ent the franchise opportunity to prospec- tive franchisees. We use a multi-channel marketing approach to drive interest in the events. We include the existing local fran- chisees in these events for validation and give them an opportunity to get to know their potential colleagues. This process is helping build a culture of franchisees who embrace the growth of the system. While I’m admittedly a student of franchising, I’ve been in the property restoration industry for more than two decades. I make it a priority to make myself accessible to franchisees. They all have my cell number and can reach out to me with questions about everything from locking in an account to billing for a large commercial loss and collecting on a delinquent account. Describe your leadership style. I be- lieve strongly in servant leadership. When working with my team, I ask them: “What do you need that I’ll be able to help you with so that your team can succeed?” I in- still confidence in the people I’m leading. I hire the best leaders and managers I can find, and then I serve them. What has inspired your leadership style? Many people and experiences have con- tributed to the way I approach leadership. One person who had a great influence was Jack Welch, former chairman and CEO of General Electric, who later authored several business books. He believed in recruiting the best talent and empowering them to lead their teams, set their own goals, while at the same time holding them accountable. I was inspired by his ability to achieve results across such a huge, multinational company with multiple divisions, and the culture that was driven from the top down to the entire organization. What is your biggest leadership chal- lenge? Adjusting to the process and time it takes to enact change within a franchise organization. I’ve served as CEO for various privately owned companies over the past 20 years. In those roles, I’ve made decisions to make changes and had the ability to make change immediately. As a franchisor, you can’t just make a decision and mandate it across the board. It requires consensus and education to earn the critical buy-in of the franchisees. I’m learning to appreciate this process. We listen closely to our franchise owners. What’s important to them has a significant impact on how we make key strategic decisions. How do you transmit your culture from your office to front-line employees? Ou &W6FVB7FWfRvFR2FRw&VB b'VFr7G&r7VGW&R&Vf&Rg&氥F'&RB&VvBFR67FWfR@&VG6WB6ƖBfVFFf7W6VB6W'frW"g&66RvW'2RvVBW@BWB7BbFRvW'2f6RFf6RFV&FV"6VvW2Fr6R'V@G'W7BFR6VFW'6f7W2&Vf&6rFRw&VBv&7FWfR2FPB&6rFR&"f"&VVFW727W7FW 6W'f6Rg&W"7W'BFVFW g&66RvW'2bg&66VRVVG27WЧ'BvR6B&RvƖrFvWB6VPFFV"6FGFW"bW'2vPW7BF6W'fRW"g&66RvW'2vW&R2FR&W7B6RF&W&Rf VFW'6$66"DЧv2vFVBFvWBג$BFVvBvVBv&6F66RbגVF'2VFFFVvBR6WFrvVv2גV&ǒ#2FBǒגvƖfRB6&VW"FF2FBFV6FЦRvvƗ7FVRFBRF&VRf7F'06VBfVV6RFV6627W'&VFrW &fW76gWGW&SV&rV&r@vfrV&ǒW"6&VW"7BbW FV6626VB&R&6VBV&rFP&&G2FfW"F&vFF2vRV&rvv2&R66W&P6VB6W'6Vb( vW&RvrFV&FR7CvW&R6vFRF0f"גF&FBv&R&VVf6FW"ג6&VW#( RvƖVǒfRF67&f6PFRV&rV&ǒff"bFRV&rखbRfW7FVBFRƖ( 26&RbFRf'7@'BbW"6&VW"V&r^( fP6vf6BVBbV&rFVF৖W"F&'FRFRR&V6W"C2ॖW"6&VW"FV662FRWBGvFV6FW06FV&R6gFVBFf7W2V&rFVV&rBvfrFV6R^( &RV &WF&VVBW"6&VW"&&FW26VB6g@Fv&BvfrV&rBV&rF@&FW"vFWBF2Gf6RvVF( BfPBFR6fFV6RF&RFRF( Цrג6V6B"gFW"6VvRFCC6'V'&67FVBbC6'Wr&6Gv&VƖWfVBvVBV&&Rv&r6W"&fFVǒVB6f"6VbЦFRVG&W&VWW"Ff"f'GVRS6FRWfVbV&rv2&W@V7W&RB7&VBRFfRFR6fЦFV6RFW&66Rגv6&6VF6F7G&RB#rF26琦&V6RFRFf&f"&Vf"U4vW&P24TG&fR&WfVVW2g&C3R֖ƖFCC֖ƖW7BVvBV'2pBFR&WBVFW"'FW&6vVF( B&RvW&RrBFVFPvW"r"Wr&&RFVvFV662&W7BFV'PW'6rFRRFVvFV6Ч63fRSS'FW"6F( BPFV66vFWBffrBf6PfW'6&VƖWfR6V7Fr2V6f"ЦFg&FR7FVFW'2276&RॖRfRFƗ7FVBVWW"fvW"FRV6RbvN( 2'FBFFRFVVR&W7V7B7G&rVFW'6FW6P&W7V7BvVFWFFV"VFW"6( BGVRvFFV"2FRvBF&RƖVB"&W7V7FVC&W7V7FVB( B&WBvrV"ЦG6FW7B( f7W6VBFrFR&v@Fr'WBBFVV6f7FW"F7@VR&R67W7FVBFGf6RF4Tv&W3FRWFvW"2BW6rBFFW2F( BGFW"ख&v旦FVRrv0FRW'6vW"R6VBf7W2'VFrFVbVRvr^( FR'VWBf"FVǒFVvFW&V6&6FRBFBBBFW6( BBЧFW"vBW"FFR2&V6W6R^( fPW'6vW"vVV@FW67&&RW"vVVB7GSPfRFG'W7BW"FVBW"VRॖRfRFvfRFVrV6BFPG'VR&ƗGF'VvFBvVRF6RWBFV7&VBFV"vw2B2Ц6Ɨ6BvW"WfVF&RFWvVBfR&R&W7G&7FVBVf&ЦVB6WBvWV7FF2ƖRFW6PF2wb^( fRWfW"&VVFFpG&6^( F6RFBFvWBFRw&WVG0F'Vf7BFW&^( 2v2&&&B'VpVBbFVBf7FW"6Rגv&WF2VBvFWB6rRאFVFFFrFB( B&VG6WGFrFR6Rf"BvW"WfVFVN( 2GFW"bVf6rFB( 6W'fpFVFWrFBFW66R@( &R&RFVFVRfRFW@FV'V( FB&Rf&RFVFVЧvVVVFVBvBFW2W"vVVBFVЦƖSN( 266VBbWW&V6VBFVFVBvW'2v&W7BvVF6W"Рg&66WWFFR55TR#r