Fragrance Notes ISSUE 1, 2018 - Page 22

FEATURE Paul’s children: Freya, Nicolas, and Joel “I can’t even eat a bowl of cereal with just one kind. It always has to be a combination. Same with fragrance. I want to play with my perfumer’s mind sometimes, customizing cereals and fragrances.” in-between,” he says. When he was young, he used to stay up late on Sunday evenings to record the Top 20 onto cassette tapes, and today he finds he is always listening to something, even while working. “I feel like I’m less productive without music,” he says. And while he notes that he cannot play a single sheet of music, he says he has a database in his head of the greatest bands of all time: Oasis, Blur, Queen, Prince, and The Smiths. Both his music and his fragrance preferences are often dictated by his mood. “I know my limit for stress when I stop listening to my music,” he says. “That’s my breaking point, when I have to recalibrate... I’ll stop being sensitized to things.” He admits to liking natural smells—big blocks of wood, anything earthy. As is clear from his taste in music, he likes a little bit of everything blended together. “I can’t even eat a bowl of cereal with just one 22 FRAGRANCE NOTES ISSUE 1, 2018 Paul’s daughter Freya, who is a very talented dancer, has a wonderful social media presence. Follow her on Instagram and Musical.ly at freyaireland. kind. It always has to be a combination. Same with fragrance. I want to play with my perfumer’s mind sometimes, customizing cereals and fragrances.” He also expressed deep appreciation for travel, which he does frequently for work and for pleasure. He has a special affinity for the desolation of Iceland; his visit to Reykjavik completely blew him away. He says he enjoys being in the hills, on the moors, “which is weird because I like to surround myself with people but can still appreciate an open sky.” He also loves “the Scandinavian vibe,” the Greek islands, and the Amalfi coast. An Example to Follow “You work all your life for your family; now, you’re working for 3,000 families.” One of the more memorable pieces of advice he’s received was from one of his mentors, his purchasing director at the time, who told him during a big negotiation, “We’re not building airplanes that are going to fall out of the sky.” His mentor was someone who didn’t say much, but when he did say something, he made it count. He taught Ireland to work hard but never take things too seriously. “When we work too hard or are unhappy, we are less productive, so it’s a negative cycle,” he says. “I even even teach this to my kids, telling them, ‘Whatever decision you make is okay.’” “When we negotiate, it gets personal, so I try not to be emotional in that sense. It is always important to put things into