Forward December 2017 Forward_2017Dec WEB - Page 30

PR E PA R ATORY S C HO OL From the story of the trap-door spiders in Kings Park to the story of the two white seals near Elizabeth Quay, the students respectfully and creatively performed with absolute aplomb. musicians and work out the range of sounds and effects they could achieve. Students then took advantage of Dr Brophy’s mentoring to tease out their ideas and create a large piece of music. The resulting music was, simply speaking, wonderful, and allowed the audience to hear the babbling brooks, whistling spears, laughing kookaburras and the hot, still moods of the country. Each piece was fully notated and rehearsed until it was finally brought to life in front of the 300-strong crowd. The students even lead the Orchestra, conducting their own works! The visual arts students created two stunning canvas banners, each 5m x 2m, depicting their stories in beautifully crafted detail. The artwork on the banners was of such a high quality that the West Australian Symphony Orchestra has asked if they can borrow them to display in the foyer of the Perth Concert Hall during their 2018 season! These images have also been used to form the backdrop to the Welcome to Country for the 2017 Asia Pacific Regional Conference Gala Dinner, with organisers telling us that the images are some of the best they have seen. While the music and art groups were working hard, the dance groups were busy learning moves and choreographing their stories to communicate them through the medium of dance. This was how many of the early aboriginal groups communicated with each other, as with over 200 languages, vocal communication was often difficult! Accompanied by Mr Beck on Didgeridoo and one or two guest teachers on rhythm sticks, the students did so much more than just bring the stories to life. From the story of the trap-door spiders in Kings Park to the story of the two white seals near Elizabeth Quay, the students respectfully and creatively performed with absolute aplomb. The whole project was vibrant and alive from beginning to the end. Giving the students ‘free reign’, but also ultimate responsibility over the final product was both a terrifying and highly edifying process. To see not just the outcomes of each of the arts, but also the outcomes in terms of mathematics, logistics, inter and intra-personal relationships and many, many other areas was just incredible. Credit must go to Mr David Taylor and the whole Year 5/6 team for getting behind the project from the very beginning. Without their help, guidance and assistance the project would not have been anywhere near as successful! Special thanks must also go to the administration and musicians of the West Australian Symphony Orchestra. Their professionalism, ability to think outside of the box and engagement with each and every student was simply outstanding! The stories of the Wadjuk Noongar people have a great deal that they can teach us. They are the stories of the land that we share and the paths that we now walk together. If this project did nothing more than allow the students to hear and understand these stories then it was successful. For the students to respond to and share these stories is far more than successful, it opens the door to our shared future together. Kieran M Hurley Director of Music 31