Fort Worth Business Press, June 2, 2014 Vol. 26, No. 22

June 9 - 15, 2014 Vol. 26, No. 22 • $3.00 Western roundup New Stockyards plan calls for development maintaining heritage LEFT: Paella is a popular Spanish rice dish that originated on the east coast of Spain in Valencia. It is often regarded as the national dish of Spain. Sera Dining & Wine offers this dish and many others at its Forest Park location. n Scott Nishimura photos by alyson peyton perkins snishimura@bizpress.net Sera offers contemporary Spanish cuisine Tamarind Phinisee n Fort Worth Business Press Contributor P atrons looking for traditional Spanish food with a modern flair may not have to look farther than a relatively new restaurant called Sera Dining & Wine. Not to be confused with the Mexican or Tex-Mex food style, Sera features traditional foods from Spain and wine from coastal France, Spain and Portugal. See sera u 20-21 LEFT: Sera Dining & Wine features traditional foods from Spain and wine from coastal France, Spain and Portugal. The restaurant, owned by Fort Worth native John Marsh, is located at 2418 Forest Park Blvd, about a half mile from Texas Christian University. ABOVE: Executive chef Brandon Hudson in the kitchen. feeling right at home New entrepreneur John Riggins couldn’t stay away from pursuing his dream job owning a senior services franchise. P12 Fort Worth’s historic Stockyards, transformed in the 1990s when businessman Holt Hickman converted the old hog and sheep pens into the Stockyards Station festival center and added a visitors center, could be headed for another re-awakening. The Hickman family is teaming up with Majestic Realty Co. of California on a $175 million mixed-use Holt Hickman project that could include corporate headquarters, hotels, destination retail and restaurants on Marine Creek, craft breweries, and residential Brad Hickman Sr. space, as well as a redevelopment of the old horse and mule barns. The partnership, Fort Worth Heritage Development Cavileer LLC, takes in a major portion of the holdings owned by the Hickman family and Dallas investor Lyda Hunt Hill, including Stockyards Station and the mule barns, said Majestic principal Craig Cavileer and Hickman vice president Brad Hickman Sr. They spoke in an interview after disclosing the project to Mayor Betsy Price and City Council members June 3. Hill has decided to exit her interests and is negotiating with the partnership, they said. See stockyards u 8