Flashmag Digizine Edition Issue 110 October 2020 - Page 96

..............96............

"The research suggests there might be social factors playing a role in women's disordered eating," Reynolds said. "It might be helpful to identify women at risk of developing more extreme weight-loss behaviors, which have been linked to other forms of psychological distress, such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse and dissatisfaction with life."

Meltzer added: "In order to better understand women's dieting motivations, the findings of this study highlight the value of adopting an approach that focuses on a couple's relationship."

The study advanced existing research from the Meltzer lab that found marriages tend to be more successful and satisfying when wives are more attractive than their husbands. It examined 113 newlywed couples -- married less than four months, average age late 20s, living in the Dallas area -- who agreed to be rated on their attractiveness.

Each participant completed a lengthy questionnaire focusing in part on their desire to diet or have a thin body. Some questions included, "I feel extremely guilty after eating," "I like my stomach to be empty," and "I'm terrified of gaining weight."

A full-body photograph was taken of every participant and rated on a scale of 1 to 10. Two teams of undergraduate evaluators studied the photos: one at Southern Methodist University in Texas focused on spouses' facial attractiveness, while another at FSU looked at body attractiveness. The evaluators varied in sex and ethnic makeup.

Reynolds said some research has shown women tend to overperceive just how thin their partners want them to be and, as a result, may inappropriately pursue dieting and a thin body.

"One way to help these women is for partners to be very reaffirming, reminding them, 'You're beautiful. I love you at any weight or body type,'" Reynolds said. "Or perhaps focusing on the ways they are a good romantic partner outside of attractiveness and emphasizing those strengths: 'I really value you because you're a kind, smart and supportive partner.'"

Reynolds thinks an interesting next step for research would be to explore whether women are more motivated to diet when they are surrounded by attractive female friends.

"If we understand how women's relationships affect their decision to diet and the social predictors for developing unhealthy eating behaviors," Reynolds said, "then we will be better able to help them."

Meanwhile in a study realized in scotland less attractive men seem despite all have the upper hand in relationship while they are creative. Average-looking men become more alluring when women sense the man has an imaginative spark. In the other hand less attractive women when showing the same creativity are less attractive in the mating game.

“Creative women with less attractive faces seem to be perhaps penalized in some way,” said Christopher Watkins, a psychologist at Abertay University in Scotland, who carried out the research.

Watkins first recruited a batch of volunteers who looked at pictures of men and women, rating each on the basis of their physical looks alone.

Armed with this benchmark of beauty, he then submitted the same pictures to another group of volunteers – but this time he provided clues about the subjects’ creativity.

Attached to each picture were mini exercises in the imagination.

Surreal test

In one test, there was a 100-word text based on “The Lovers”, a surrealist painting by Rene Magritte in which two lovers kiss, their heads strangely covered in white cloths.

Half of these texts, attributed to the persons pictured, were dull or factual (“Are they being held hostage?”), and the other half were inspired or conceptual (“It is perhaps an indicator that looks fade and in the end it does not matter as you will always be left with the personality of someone”).

In a second test, head shots were linked with an everyday object – a tyre – and a text describing an alternative use for it. Half of these descriptions were inventive, others less so.

The results showed that men with less attractive faces get a big boost in the popularity contest if they show a creative touch, Watkins found.

“Creative guys with less attractive faces were almost identical in attractiveness to really good looking guys who were not as creative,” he says.

The top-ranked men were those considered to be both physically attractive and creative.

For women, though, the news is not so good. Looks remain paramount.

In one experiment, creativeness did nothing to boost the allure of attractive women – and it even reduced the appeal of less attractive women.

However, another experiment on similar lines had conflicting findings, Watkins found: creativity showed an equally boosting effect for average-looking women and male counterparts.

He’s a geek? Swipe left

Why would women rate creativity among men so highly?

Watkins pointed to evolutionary biology – the

hidden criteria that drive us to seek the best mate

Flashmag October 2020 www.flashmag.net