Fish Sniffer On Demand Digital Edition Issue 3714 June 22-July 6, 2018 - Page 3

Up-To-Date and Published Locally... By Sportsmen... For Sportsmen! Folsom Lake Map Feature MADE IN U.S.A See Page 14 Vol. 37 - ISS.14 Our 36th Year Since 1982 June 22 - July 6, 2018 “The Magazine for West Coast Sportsmen!” Team Fish Sniffer Enjoys Hot Potluck Action Aboard Capt. James Smith’s Iconic California Dawn! O ne moment the rod tip was bobbing gently up and down as the sinker glided and ticked across the bottom. A beat later the tip bent down a couple inches and stopped moving. Something had latched onto my anchovy and from the way the rod reacted I knew it was likely a halibut. Careful not to elevate the rod tip and pull the bait out of the fish’s mouth, I slipped the rod out of the holder and eased the tip down toward the water giving the fish a yard or two of slack. When the line came tight I felt a couple tugs. Fighting the impulse to set the hook I remained statue still and let the rod load up. The tugs became more and more intense. That’s when I made my move. Thumbing the spool, I jabbed the hook home and the rod bent into a satisfying bend. I could tell instantly that it was a good fish. When it comes to catching big California halibut I typically don’t have very good luck. I’ve literally spent thousands of hours drifting live baits both inside and outside the bay. And while I’ve caught more keeper halibut than I can remember, the biggest California halibut I’ve caught weighed in at 21 pounds. That’s a nice fish to be sure, but far from the 30 pounder I’ve dreamed of for decades. With all this in mind, I played the fish with a light drag and a delicate touch. I worked the reel steadily, only gaining a few inches of line Brittany Young landed several fish aboard the now and then. California Dawn including these quality stripers The halibut was swimming during the June 1 Cal Kellogg School Of Fishing along with the boat and was determined event. Photo by CAL KELLOGG, Fish Sniffer Staff. to stay near the bottom. I was nervous. I knew the fish was heavy, but I had no idea how heavy. It could have been it no reason to bolt and rip out the hook, th e fish I’d been dreaming of and I was tangle a line or snap the leader. determined to slowly wear it down, giving CONTINUED ON PAGE 20 GONE FISHING by Cal Kellogg Trout Troller Hooks Rattlesnake-Eating Catfish R not ready for even a stranger surprise. “The fish didn’t put up much of a fight – I just dragged it in and my dad netted it,” said Hollister. “My dad gave me the net so I could take out the hook and re- lease the fish. I opened the fish’s mouth so I could remove the hook when I saw a scaly diamond pattern.” “I told my dad, ‘I think this fish has a snake in it. As he pulled the hook out of the fish’s mouth, the hook (925) 428-1103 www.dragonsportfishing.com grabbed the snake, a rattlesnake,” said Hollister. The snake was already dead, with Butch Betschart of Milton successfully battled this German brown weighing 9 pounds, bite marks on it 10 ounces while fishing with pro guide Monte Smith of Gold Country Sportfishing at from the bullhead’s New Melones Reservoir this May. teeth. “The snake yan Hollister of Turlock was trolling a worm on an Uncle Larry’s spinner for trout at New Melones Lake when he hooked and landed a surprise brown bullhead catfish measuring 14 inch- es long on Sunday, May 27. He was fishing with his dad, Jim, at 45 feet deep over 115 feet of water near the spillway, a strange place for this bot- tom-dwelling species to be. Yet, he was was longer that the catfish that ate it,” said Hollister, a high school geology and environmental science teacher at Turlock High School. The duo didn’t get the species they were targeting – rainbow trout, although they lost one near the boat. They did release a couple of spot- ted bass, and of course, the snake-eating catfish. They were fishing about 75 yards from shore near the spillway. “I don’t know what that catfish was doing that far from the bank, but it was a very memorable day,” he concluded. In a tweet to Hollister, Jon Rosenfeld, a conser- vation biologist and lead scientist for The Bay Institute, quipped, “Congratu- lations on catching a personal example of how food webs really work. Fish eat whatever they (a) overlap with in space & time that (b) fits in their mouth + (c) WHAT’S HOT by Dan Bacher Photo courtesy of GOLD COUNTRY SPORTFISHING, Oakdale. 36 Years Serving Sportsmen CONTINUED ON PAGE 19 California Lacks Real Marine Protection as Offshore Drilling Expands in State Waters See Page 22 Special Section Baja Roundup PG 27 INSIDE Area Reports FRESHWATER REPORTS Almanor - American Basin.....................................4 American River - Camanche Lake.........................7 Carson Pass Region - East Delta ..................... 8-9 Eastern Sierra - New Melones Reservoir............11 Oroville Lake - San Pablo Reservoir.............. 12-13 Santa Clara Valley Lakes - West Delta......... 16-17 Wild Horse Reservoir.........................................19 SALTWATER REPORTS Berkeley - Bodega Bay.........................................22 Half Moon Bay - Half Moon Bay............................25 Monterey - Peninsula Shoreline...........................26 FEATURES Where...When...How... BAJA ROUNDUP.................................................... 27 BASS FISHING SPOTLIGHT: Randy Pringle.............. 14 BULLETIN BOARD................................................... 4 FISH SNIFFER HOW-TO: Cal Kellogg..................... 5 GO FOR IT: Staff....................................................... 6 KAYAK FISHING SPOTLIGHT: Matt Mayes............ 10 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR...................................... 3 MAP FEATURE: Dan Bacher.............................14-15 SALTY TIPS: Steve “Hippo” Lau............................. 26 SPOTLIGHT ON CONSERVATION: Dan Bacher..... 22 WHAT’S HOT SALTWATER: Kathie Morgan .......... 24 STAFF TACKLE What We’re Using Cal Kellogg - fished for San Francisco Bay halibut and stripers aboard the California Dawn. Cal used a 7’ Cousins Classic Fiberglass F870-7 rod teamed with a PENN lever drag Fathom reel spooled with 65 pound test Yo-Zuri Super Braid in the blue color. On the business end of the rig Cal used a three way live bait leader constructed of Yo-Zuri H.D. Carbon fluorocarbon leader material tipped with an Eagle Claw Lazer Sharp octopus hook. Using this rig Cal landed 4 keeper halibut and 6 keeper size stripers. Paul Kneeland - fished Pyramid Lake with Bridget Looney in the Fish Sniffer 21’ Rogue Jet Coastal. They caught Lahontan cutthroat trout to 8.8 pounds, using a Daiwa DXS 8’ light action IM-7 graphite trigger stick rigged with the new Daiwa Lexa 100 Line counter reel loaded with 8 lb test Yozuri Topknot line. They trolled Canberra Killer Tasmanian Devils and Bottom Line Tackle B-21 spoons in bloody frog off the Canon Downriggers at 35 feet deep and 2.5 mph. Dan Bacher - fished at Folsom Lake with Captain James Netzel of Tight Lines Guide Service. He caught five rain- bows to 15 inches while trolling with 1/6 oz. Speedy Shiners in copper, brown trout, nickel/chartreuse and wonderbread colors. He used Cousins kokanee composite 7’ 3’’ and 7’ 9’’ rods teamed up with Daiwa Lexa 100 reels, filled with Fins 25 lb. test 40 G Braid line and tipped with 30 feet of Gamma Edge 12 lb. test fluorocarbon.