First American Art Magazine No. 22, Spring 2019 - Page 80

PROFILE above The Basket Maker from The Makers series, 2018, hand- processed Jemez Pueblo clay, slip, underglazes, acrylic, wood panel, 22 × 26 × 4 in. opposite Pottery Maker from The Makers series, 2018, hand- processed Jemez Pueblo clay, slip, underglazes, acrylic, wood panel, 48 × 36 × 6 in. helps me persevere to the next project or into the next chapter of whatever is going on in my life.” These are words worth repeating: they’ll grow on you and change your mind about not always hitting the mark, if you let them.] RD: Have you thought about collabo- rating with other artists? KW: I always planned to collaborate but haven’t done it yet. Mostly it’s because of the lack of time and not being able to make that commitment. When you’re so involved with your own work and trying to get all your stuff done, it’s really hard to experiment with another artist. I have been wanting to for so long, but, because I’ve always been such a non-collaborator, I just don’t know how to do it yet. I’m not sure where to begin or who I would ask. 78 | WWW.FIRSTAMERICANARTMAGAZINE.COM RD: What about the element of humor in your work? Can you offer a few words on that? KW: The element of humor isn’t always intentional; it’s just something that comes out naturally. I believe it’s like that with other artists, too, in that the artwork resembles the maker. The smile or the sense of humor that comes out is a natural reflection of myself. RD: What role do you think spirituality plays in Native art? KW: Of course our art plays a role in our spiritual lives. But I don’t take that to my work. I keep my religion and my spiritual beliefs to myself. RD: How does your work feed into the larger narrative of contemporary Indian art?