First American Art Magazine No. 19, Summer 2018 - Page 24

SEVEN DIRECTIONS (Plains Cree-Siksika). According to the museum’s website, these 21st-century Native artists seek to deconstruct the myths and preconceptions about Native people through their art. The depiction of Indigenous people in art of the American West has perpetuated and continues to perpetuate stereotypes, so this exhibition “aims to give voice to Native people and communities to show their resiliency and power over the ways in which they are portrayed and perceived.” tacomaartmuseum.org/exhibit/ native-portraiture EAST. The Antique Tribal Art Dealers Association (ATADA), a professional orga- nization of art dealers specializing in Native American and international tribal arts, has recently returned more than one hundred ceremonial artifacts to Southwestern tribes. The repatriation is the result of the orga- nization’s Voluntary Returns Program. ATADA representatives work directly with tribal communities and spiritual leaders. It is impossible to estimate the number of sacred and ceremonial items circulating in private collections, and much work remains to ensure that objects are returned to their benjamin harjo jr. american indian artist the shout, 2017, graphite and colored pencil on arches watercolor paper, 8½ × 12 inches B E N J A M I N H A R J O J R .C O M 22 | WWW.FIRSTAMERICANARTMAGAZINE.COM