Fields Notes 18.1 - Page 17

Participants at the Workshop on Wildland Fire Appropriate Response: Generating and Using Science • February 27 and 28, 2018 Workshop on Wildland Fire Appropriate Response: Generating and Using Science February 27 and 28, 2018 • Western University Organizers: Douglas Woolford and Matt Davison (Western University), Charmaine Dean (University of Waterloo), Colin McFayden (Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources & Forestry), and Mike Wotton (Canadian Forest Service) How do you put out a forest fire? Should you sometimes let it burn? Which mathematical and statistical techniques can be used to aid wildland fire response? These were some of the questions addressed by the two-day Workshop on Wildland Fire Appropriate Response: Generating and Using Science at Western University this past February. The workshop was intentionally cross-disciplinary so that academic researchers and fire management agency staff could identify and make rapid progress on key topics of interest to fire management agencies. It was sponsored by the Aviation, Forest Fire and Emergency Services Branch of the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (AFFES-MNRF), Western University’s newly formed School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, and the Fields Institute. Participants comprised researchers and students from the computational, environmental, operational research, mathematical, and statistical sciences along with staff from Canadian wildland fire management agencies and the US Forest Service. The overarching objective was to strengthen emerging multidisciplinary teams from a network of universities to collaborate directly on high-impact research problems. Barriers and opportunities to generate new data-driven science were discussed, along with how to bring the resulting research into practical use for wildland fire management decision support. The three sections of the workshop's schedule provided opportunities to identify, design and work on solutions directly with researchers and fire management practitioners: 1. Context setting (presentations on fire management problems and academic solutions), 2. Decision support systems used or being developed by agencies, and 3. Break-out sessions to identify specific areas of work and requirements under the broader categories of decision support and appropriate response. The context was set through a series of short presentations where fire management agency staff 17