eTwinning Visibility Newsletter no. 4 eTwinning Visibility Newsletter no. 4 - Page 33

Visibility of eTwinning Projects Group July 2014 Newsletter ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------   this portal, you can attend webinars or online workshops about several topics which can be useful not only for a project but also for your job as a teacher. You can meet very motivated colleagues from Europe and your own country too. Continuous personal growth, because thanks to the eTwinning portal you can become an ambassador. My Photo Camera and eTwinning by Diana Nicoleta Chirila Why must I take my photo camera? I can take just ‘photos’, but not ‘very good pictures’… Why just one of a hundred pictures of mine is ‘good’? And the questions go on and on… But why do we need to take photos in our eTwinning projects? You can say: “To prove that happened!” Do you think that your work before the project and during the activities are mirroring in your pictures? Yes! You will see the work before the events after all stuff is finished! Hoping that my opinion will not change in the future, I wish you all the best for your summer holidays and a wonderful new school year full of interesting eTwinning projects! The main rule: to split the image into 9 equal quadrants and to put ‘your subject of the picture’ approximatively 1/3 horizontally and 1/3 vertically. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ If you search on the Internet for ‘rules to take a good photo’, you will find a vast amount of information. Two good links are here: http://www.photographymad.com/pages/vi ew/10-top-photography-composition-rules; http://www.digital-photosecrets.com/tip/3372/18-composition-rulesfor-photos-that-shine/. Remember: “Before photographing your subject, take time to think about where you will shoot it from. Our viewpoint has a massive impact on the composition of our photo, and as a result it can greatly affect the message that the shot conveys. Rather than just shooting from eye level, consider photographing from high above, down at ground level, from the side, from the back, from a long way away, from very close up, and so on.” – source: www.photographymad.com 33