Equine Health Update EHU Vol 20 Issue 01 - Page 17

EQUINE | Abstracts Cranial Nuchal Bursitis Diagnosis, treatment and outcome of cranial nuchal bursitis in 30 horses A. L. Bergren, G. A. Abuja, K. A. Bubeck, T. J. P. Spoormakers, J. M. García-López Background No large retrospective case series describing the treat- ment and outcomes following diagnosis of cranial nu- chal bursitis have been published. Objective To describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic tech- niques, treatment and outcome of horses suffering from cranial nuchal bursitis and to determine their outcome after medical or surgical treatment. Study design Retrospective case series. Methods Medical records (1990–2014) of two referral centres were reviewed for signalment, diagnostic features, method of treatment (medical, surgical or both) and outcome. Results The median age of horses was 13 years (range 5–22 years) and follow‐up time ranged from 12 to 108 months. Fourteen horses were treated medically and 20 horses were treated surgically. Of those horses treated medically, four horses had recurrence of clini- cal signs requiring subsequent surgical treatment. Overall, 41.7% of horses had recurrence of clinical signs following treatment and 66.7% of horses were able to return to their previous level of exercise. Five horses underwent more than one surgical procedure due to recurrence of clinical signs. Of those horses treated solely surgically, 28.6% of the horses had re- currence of clinical signs and 78.6% returned to their previous level of exercise. Of those horses treated solely medically, 33.3% had recurrence of clinical signs and 66.7% returned to their previous level of exercise. Of those horses treated surgically following failed medical management, 100% had recurrence of clinical signs and 25% returned to their previous level of exercise. Main limitations Retrospective design with small sample number. Conclusions Nuchal bursitis can be successfully managed with ei- ther medical or surgical treatment. Prognosis for return to work tends to be worse in horses requiring surgical intervention following failed medical management. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/evj.12787/full • Volume 20 Issue 1 | April 2018 • 17