Enlightenment Issue MADE Magazine - Page 14

MADEFEATURES MADEXXXX our thoughts. We’re slaves to our own mental handicaps. MADE: After reading Black Privilege, it sparked something in us. We’re even more motivated to go after everything we want in life. CTG: You have no choice! You have no other option. We’re fully aware of everything that faces us in America. With you, not only are you Black, you’re a woman, so you have double issues. I’m Black, but guess what? We have no choice. Racism can’t stop you, sexism can’t stop you— nothing. All of that exists and we know that, but you still have to wake up and go get it. The reason I named the book Black Privilege is because I want us to start feeling special about ourselves again. I’m hearing all this talk about White supremacy, white nationalism and we talk about white privilege. All of this is absolutely true, but a lot of times that creates a black inferiority complex. Because if we’re not privileged, then what does that mean? It bothers me when I hear kids say that. They’re like, “I don’t understand this concept of “Black privilege. Black people ain’t got no privilege.” And it’s like, my brother, you don’t think it’s a privilege to be black? Who taught you to hate yourself? the air and he would just hear me and be like, “I think there’s something there.” Being that I didn’t have a real background, I would literally just come on the air and just talk. I’d be drunk, I’d be high and I would just be talking the same way we’re talking right now. I used to scream a lot back then too. I used to be yelling and I’d just take phone calls. That was the easiest thing to do—take phone calls and just talk to the people. And that’s kind of what separated me from everybody else because I didn’t sound like everyone else. I wasn’t doing what everybody else was doing. I didn’t get OPPORTUNITY DOESN’T COME WITH MONETARY VALUE. A REAL OPPORTUNITY IS LIFE-CHANGING, AND A LOT OF TIMES IT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH MONEY.” MADE: Let’s get into your start in radio. You didn’t go to college—you came from the streets and went straight to radio. How did you develop your skill set in the beginning? CTG: The best thing about it is that I didn’t have a radio background. I didn’t even know I had a radio skill set. The only thing I could rely on at the end of the day was me. The reason why Ron White even put me on the air is because he enjoyed having conversations with me. He just thought I would have an energy on the air. I used to come in every now and then with one of the nighttime personalities, so I would get on CREDIT: WARDROBE: HARRISON CRITE | GROOMING: AYANNA WILLIAMS PROD. ASSTS: ALANA GATLING | FAYOLA ABAYOMI | CREATIVE DIRECTOR: KRIS D. WILLIAMS caught up in that robotic programming way of doing radio. I just couldn’t do it. I couldn’t just open the mic like, “The time is 7:20, the temperature is 83 degrees, now here’s that Party Next Door and Drake,” I just couldn’t do that. It wasn’t in me. The best thing that happened for me was that I didn’t have a skill set. I just had to rely on me. MADE: Starting out as an intern at Z93 Jamz, you were making little to no money. How would you describe your grind while working in South Carolina? made-magazine.com | 14 MADEFEATURES MADEXXXX our thoughts. We’re slaves to our own mental handicaps. MADE: After reading Black Privilege, it sparked something in us. We’re even more motivated to go after everything we want in life. CTG: You have no choice! You have no other option. We’re fully aware of everything that faces us in America. With you, not only are you Black, you’re a woman, so you have double issues. I’m Black, but guess what? We have no choice. Racism can’t stop you, sexism can’t stop you— nothing. All of that exists and we know that, but you still have to wake up and go get it. The reason I named the book Black Privilege is because I want us to start feeling special about ourselves again. I’m hearing all this talk about White supremacy, white nationalism and we talk about white privilege. All of this is absolutely true, but a lot of times that creates a black inferiority complex. Because if we’re not privileged, then what does that mean? It bothers me when I hear kids say that. They’re like, “I don’t understand this concept of “Black privilege. Black people ain’t got no privilege.” And it’s like, my brother, you don’t think it’s a privilege to be black? Who taught you to hate yourself? the air and he would just hear me and be like, “I think there’s something there.” Being that I didn’t have a real background, I would literally just come on the air and just talk. I’d be drunk, 'e$ݽձЁ)хѡ݅ͅݗeɔхɥЁܸ$)͕Ѽ͍ɕЁѡѽ$͕Ѽ)啱'eЁх̸QЁ݅)ѡͥЁѡѼQх́)ЁхѼѡѡӊéݡ)͕Ʌѕɽٕ剽䁕͔͔$)eЁͽչٕ役͔$݅ͻeЁ)ݡЁٕ剽䁕͔݅́$eЁ)=AA=IQU9%Qd)=M;eP =5)]%Q 5=9QId)Y1UI0)=AA=IQU9%Qd%L)1% !9%9)91=P=)Q%5L%P!L)9=Q!%9Q<<)]%Q 5=9dt) I%P]II= !II%M=8 I%QI==5%9e99]%11%5L)51ӊéЁѼ)AI=MMQL19Q1%9e=1 e=5$ IQ%Y%I Q=H-I%L]%11%5L)хЁɅeԁeЁѼ)՝ЁѡЁɽѥɽɅ݅)Qԁɽѡɕ́ݕ)Ʌ$ЁձeЁи$ձe)ɅЁѼɅ!܁ԁٕȁͭ)ЁѡqQѥ̀ѡ)͕Ёѡ)ѕɅɔ̀́ɕ̰܁ɗéѡЁA)9ЁȁɅt$ЁձeЁѡи%) QQЁѡЁЁ́ѡЁ$eЁٔ)݅ͻeЁQЁѡѡЁ)Ʌɽչ$eЁٕ܁$)݅́ѡЁ$eЁ͕ٔͭи$ЁѼ)Ʌ͕ͭиQѡ$ձɕ䁽)ɕ䁽)Ёѡѡ݅́Qɕͽݡ)I]єٕЁѡȁ͔́)5MхѥЁ́ѕɸЁh́))啐٥ٕͅѥ́ݥѠ!)ԁݕɔѱѼ丁!܁ݽձ)Ёѡ՝Ё$ݽձٔɝ䁽ѡȸ)ԁ͍ɥȁɥݡݽɭMѠ)$͕Ѽٕ䁹܁ѡݥѠ) ɽ)ѡѥͽѥ̰ͼ$ݽձЁ)饹(