Edge of Faith March 2017 - Page 9

Image of Sen No Rikyuin paited by Hag.

wrape words around

beauty instead of ashes. That is precisely, I believe, what Endo captured in the book, “Silence,” and many other books he has written.

That is wonderful. In your book, you talk a little bit about your art studies and I have seen your work and it is fascinating. Could you tell us a little bit about your artwork and its juxtaposition?

Sure, so I was born in Boston and went to Sweden, went to Japan for grade school and came back for middle school, high school, and college. Then, I went back for six and a half years to study this ancient technique of painting called Nihonga and Nihonga was coined in Meiji era, which is after the isolation era of Japan, but brought in modernism to Japan. It is a category that is invading Japanese-style paintings. It really is a process — I call it “slow art” — because just like “slow food,” you make your own paint and every layer takes at least half a day to dry and it is very meditative and contemplative, so to me, it suits my tempo. Yet, I am painting very large scale works that are shown in contemporary art galleries. So, my works have that categorization as well. Ultimately, I realize writing this book, that I too have been not only influenced, but been pursuing a life of beauty throughout my life. As a Christian these values have become even more important, especially recently. I continue to exhibit these works; I had a show last MayIn New York and I will have another show in May of next year.

I currently have a show up in Taipei and I will have a show up in Japan as well. These paintings are being painted as I wrote the book and as I talk about the book.

book, that I too have been not only influenced, but been pursuing a life of beauty throughout my life. As a Christian these values have become even more important, especially recently. I continue to exhibit these works; I had a show last May in New York and I will have another show in May of next year.

I currently have a show up in Taipei and I will have a show up in Japan as well. These paintings are being painted as I wrote the book and as I talk about the book.

I just want to point out for the audience too, just as you did with the appendix earlier, not only does your art have a juxtaposition of the ancient method with modern style, it is kind of a juxtaposition to modern culture, because we twitter and do things really fast, and your art is what is truly enjoyed when you stare at it for ten or fifteen minutes to actually see the layers, right?

Yeah, you may not see it right away, because some of the works are very monochromatic, and people think, “Oh that’s just a big square,” you know. But, there are layers and layers of pigments on top, and your eye can see the layers, just our brain says no.

Right.

So, we need to kind of stop and behold the surface for a while before you can even see it.

長谷川等伯 Sen no Rikyū by Hasegawa Tōhaku