EdCal EdCalv47.22

Education California | The official newspaper of the Association of California School Administrators Volume 47 | Number 22 | March 20, 2017 Superintendent Terri Rufert of Sundale UESD testifies before the State Board of Education, supported by Edgar Zazueta, Adonai Mack and Jason Henderson of ACSA’s Governmental Relations staff. ACSA voice is heard on accountability system With the state closing in on the launch of the first phase of the new accountability and continuous improvement system, ACSA has taken a leadership role in pushing for cooperation with stakeholders, in addition to providing valuable resources to district and site leaders, parents, and members of the community. “ACSA stands ready to collaborate with the State Board of Education, California Department of Education, and other stakeholders as we strive towards supporting a successful rollout and implementation of the new system,” said Terri Rufert, superintendent of Sundale UESD. Rufert testified before the Board last week, urging members to keep school climate as a local indicator, and continue to allow districts the flexibility to use a variety of local measures for those that do not use the California Healthy Kids Survey. She highlighted some issues ACSA members have raised regarding English Learner definitions in the new accountability system. “Our members are concerned there are currently three different definitions for English Learners in the new accountability system, and caution that this inconsistency will result in confusion with teachers and parents,” she said. “When districts have multiple definitions, it makes it more difficult to have discussions with stakeholders and to determine needs because they are talking about different issues at different times. Inconsistent definitions also create challenges for schools to track data and make the system much more complex.” Rufert also encouraged the CDE Periodicals Dated Material staff to continue to translate the materials and documents used into multiple languages so administrators can reach out to a larger segment of the parent and stakeholder community. During her testimony, Rufert made note of a new, two-minute video produced by ACSA highlighting the key components of the California School Dashboard. The free video is now available on the ACSA YouTube channel, as well as on ACSA’s website at www.acsa. org/accountability. ACSA’s Task Force on Accountability and Continuous Improvement is taking a holistic approach in reviewing the first phase of the accountability system. One of the goals is to inform SBE and CDE staff on policy areas and technical details that need to be re-examined during the second phase of the system and submitting a comprehensive letter to the Board. Over the coming months, the Board will be considering possible changes to several state indicators during the second phase of the accountability system. They include strengthening the College and Career Indicator with additional career metrics, developing an individual student growth measure by fall 2018, exploring whether to include long-term English learner data on the English Learner Progress Indicator, and including data on Chronic Absenteeism by fall 2017. The Board will also need to consider the metrics that could be incorporated into an accountability system supporting the unique circumstances of alternative schools, an effort that could take 12-18 months. As part of this initial conversation, Elsbeth Prigmore, principal of a See SBE, page 2 Court ruling impacts Public Records Act Emails, text messages and other written communications sent from school board members’ or district administrators’ private accounts or to public officials at such accounts may be subject to disclosure under the California Public Records Act, the California Supreme Court ruled unanimously in a highly anticipated decision published earlier this month. “All that is needed now to trigger an obligation to turn over emails regarding district business is a Public Records Act request,” said Harold Freiman, a partner at the law firm Lozano Smith. “No lawsuit or court order is needed to start the request process.” The court held that the public has a right under the CPRA to access texts, emails and other records discussing public business regardless of whether the records were created, received by, or stored in a private account. “If public officials could evade the law simply by clicking into a different email account, or communicating through a personal device,” the court wrote, “sensitive information could routinely evade public scrutiny.” This case had its origin in a 2009 lawsuit against the City of San Jose, its redevelopment agency, and several city officials. A See COURT, page 4 Medicaid changes opposed by ACSA Although Medicaid is often thought of as a program for low-income people, that does not paint the entire picture. More than 74 million people are enrolled in Medicaid, and about 40 percent of Medicaid spending goes to disabled persons. President Trump wants to change the entire system to one of block grants to states. The problem is that block grants have difficulty keeping up with rising costs. One study by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities of a GOP proposal last year similar to Trump’s plan stated Medicaid funding would be dramatically cut by onethird over the next 10 years. ACSA and the California School Boards Association have drafted a letter to policymakers in Washington, D.C. voicing opposition to the proposed Medicaid changes in the Trumpcare plan. The two associations voice their strong opposition to changes to Medicaid financ- See MEDICAID, page 5 April 21 is the deadline to apply for two upcoming ACSA seats on the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Accrediting Commission, the body responsible for accrediting independent and public K-12 schools in California. Twenty-six people serve on that commission, and seven are members of ACSA. Stepping down this year after serving as ACSA representatives are superintendents Michael McCoy and Grant Bennett. ACSA members interested in serving as a representative to WASC must: • be regular members of ACSA; • have experience in accreditation, such as experience with the commission, experience as a chairperson and/or visiting committee member or experience working on SBE appointment. Karen Valdes, assistant superintendent with Menifee UESD and president of ACSA Region 19, has just been named as a member of the State Board of Education. Valdes has served in her current position with Menifee UESD since 2006. Prior to that, she served as regional director with Riverside COE. Twitter chat. Senior Director of Member Services Margarita Cuizon will be hosting the first in a monthly series of Twitter chats focused on women's leadership. Cuizon's chat will take place March 28 at 7 PM, @ACSA_Info. ACSA awards. The statewide 2017 ACSA Administrator of the Year Awards will be announced March 27. Check the March 27 edition of EdCal, or go to www.acsa.org/awards for the complete list. César Chávez. California has established an official state holiday to honor Latino labor leader César E. Chávez, born on March 31, 1927. Teacher resources and a model curriculum on the life and work of César Chávez can be downloaded from the CDE website at http://chavez.cde.ca.gov/ ModelCurriculum/Intro.aspx. You will find biographies, pictures, and other resources on his life and farm labor issues for use in kindergarten through grade 12. The biography is available in English, Spanish, Vietnamese, Hmong, Cantonese, and Tagalog. Library survey. CDE is conducting its annual survey of school library services. The updated survey is divided into five sections that incorporate the California Model School Library Standards. The updated survey is able to better assess the library services provided by schools, as new questions have been added and schools are able to provide more detailed information than before. To access the survey, go to https://goo.gl/paOcEQ and type “ @YourLibrary”. ACSA candidates sought for seats on WASC commission school self-study committees; and • have experience working with the types of schools being accredited, such as public, private or parochial comprehensive high schools, middle schools and elementary schools, continuation high schools and adult schools. Nominees must be regular ACSA members and should have high credibility with colleagues, recognized competence in their field and be committed to ensuring highquality education for all students. They should be able and willing to devote the necessary time and energy to fully carry out the responsibilities of a commissioner. Please visit www.acsa.org/aboutus for an application form or call the ACSA Executive Department at (800) 608-ACSA.