EdCal EdCalv46.31

Education California | The official newspaper of the Association of California School Administrators Volume 46 | Number 31 | May 30 , 2016

Legislature ’ s plans for budget emerge

As the Legislature begins to move toward the June 15 constitutional deadline to produce a 2016-17 state budget , committees in both the Assembly and Senate are wrapping up their hearings on various spending plans . ACSA Legislative Advocate Martha Alvarez provided the following updates on some key budget proposals that have emerged since Gov . Jerry Brown released his May Revision .
In response to the governor ’ s budget and as part of the relatively short process to finalize the 2016-17 Budget Act , the Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee adopted its Proposition 98 budget package on May 24 , while the Assembly Budget Committee took major actions on May 26 .
• Local Control Funding Formula : The governor increased his January figure for LCFF funding by $ 154 million for a new total of $ 2.979 billion for school districts and charters , thus getting local education agencies to 95.7 percent of their full funding targets . The Assembly approved LCFF
Students learn specific skills in vehicle maintenance , as well as valuable workforce lessons in a program led by classified leaders at the Shasta County Office of Education .

Mentoring program enriches student skills in Shasta County

When people are interested in entering a particular job field , the recommendation often is to find a mentor , someone experienced in the field who can show you the ins and outs .
ACSA runs a mentoring program for new principals and superintendents , featuring a group of mentors who have extensive experience in the field . But mentorship can also apply to high school students . Dan Coyne , vehicle maintenance coordinator for the Shasta County Office of Education oversees a mentorship program for students that has operated in the county office for almost 20 years .
“ Dan is an excellent example of our classified leaders at the Shasta County Office of Education . He goes out of his way to provide opportunities for at-risk students ,” said ACSA President and Shasta COE Superintendent Tom Armelino . “ We consider ourselves fortunate to be able to offer some real , handson career educational opportunities to help students experience the work world .
“ Even if students do not choose to go
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Dated Material on to a career in the field of mechanics , they have an opportunity to learn valuable lessons – such as working with others , showing up on time , planning and providing quality work – that will serve them in whatever field they ultimately go into .”
Coyne said the numbers of students the county works with can ebb and flow each year , the programs students are interested in can change , as well as the time mentors are available , but the program keeps moving on .
“ I would say we have seen 40 to 50 students go through the shop ,” Coyne said . “ I am sure it may be more than that if I were to really dig through history .”
Coyne said the culture at Shasta COE and the personnel who work there make mentoring students something that comes naturally .
“ As technology changes , we are constantly learning and evolving here in the shop , and our mechanics love to pass that learning on ,” he said . “ We have a group of mechanics who see the value
See SHASTA , page 5 gap funding at $ 3.054 billion and the Senate increased LCFF funding to $ 3.085 billion in 2016-17 .
• Mandate Reimbursement Payments : The governor increased one-time discretionary Prop . 98 mandate repayments for school districts , charter schools and county offices of education to $ 1.416 billion – $ 237 per ADA . The Assembly decreased one-time mandate payments to $ 1.25 billion , and the Senate decreased payments to
See BUDGET , page 2

Negotiators Retreat adds key speaker

ACSA Educational Services announced the addition of Ryan Smith of the Education Trust-West as a keynote speaker for the upcoming Negotiators Planning Retreat in La Quinta .
Smith , who has served as EdTrust executive director since October 2014 , is expected to address the equity and meaningful engagement issues inherent in the new Local Control Funding Formula .
The Negotiators Planning Retreat is designed to offer successful strategies to negotiators for California school district collective bargaining . This hands-on event helps
Smith
participants develop plans for accomplishing such Local Control and Accountability Plan goals as communications , negotiating and accountability .
At EdTrust-West , the recently released report “ Black Minds Matter : Supporting the Educational Success of Black Children in California ” examines the disparities in achievement at all levels of their educational journey . The report also highlights the groundbreaking efforts under way to reverse these trends in California and close achievement and opportunity gaps for African American students .
Smith is dedicated to closing opportunity and achievement gaps for students of color and students living in poverty . He was named by Education Week as one of 10 Education Leaders to Watch nationally and also received the Families in Schools ’ Parent Engagement Leader of the Year Award .
The Negotiators Planning Retreat features experts in essential areas , including audits ; communication and outreach ; labor ,
See NEGOTIATORS , page 4
ACSA is pleased to announce statewide leadership changes for 2016-17 .
Incoming members of the Board of Directors include ACSA officers : President Ralph Gómez Porras , superintendent , Pacific Grove USD ; President-elect Lisa Gonzales , interim superintendent , Lakeside Joint SD ; and Vice President Holly Edds , assistant superintendent of educational services , Orcutt UESD .
Vice President for Legislative Action Linda Kaminski , superintendent of Azusa USD , will continue to fill that two-year position , and current President Tom Armelino , superintendent of Shasta COE , will serve as past president for 2016-17 . All leadership positions start July 1 , according to ACSA bylaws .
Graduation rates . The California Department of Education reports the state ’ s cohort graduation rate climbed for the sixth year in a row in 2015 to a record high , with the biggest jump among English Learners and migrant students . Among students who started high school in 2011-12 , 82.3 percent graduated with their class in 2015 , up 1.3 percentage points from the year before . The state ’ s graduation rate has increased substantially since the class of 2010 posted a 74.7 percent rate .
AASA awards . Any female superintendent , central office staff , school principal , classroom teacher or schoolbased specialist may be nominated or apply for the AASA Women in School Leadership Awards online at http :// womensleadership . aasa . org . The application deadline is June 15 . Awardees are recognized at the Women in School Leadership Forum , Sept . 28-30 in Newport Beach . Register for that conference at www . acsa . org / Educational- Services / Conferences / womensforum .
Charter authorizers . The 2016 California Charter Authorizers Conference is set for Sept . 11-13 in Oakland . Learn about quality charter school authorizing practices and take away valuable tools you can use ; get the latest information on developments in charter school law and policy ; and hear about authorizer supports . There is an early registration discount of $ 125 through July 1 . Register at http :// tinyurl . com / gtbbq6q .
Spotlight leaders . Education Week is seeking school district leaders whose strategies or innovations would inspire colleagues nationwide . Leaders to Learn From spotlights forwardthinking district leaders who seize on good ideas and execute them well . Next year ’ s honorees will be profiled in a 2017 special report in February and will be recognized in Washington , D . C . in March . The deadline for nominations is Aug . 1 . Visit http :// goo . gl / UmMCDD .

ACSA recognizes outgoing and incoming leaders in many roles

Approximately a third of the ACSA Board is new for 2016 , including : Elsbeth Prigmore , principal in Shasta UHSD , Region 1 ; Denise Wickham , assistant superintendent-personnel , Ceres USD , Region 7 ; Eric Andrew , superintendent , Campbell UESD , Region 8 ; Ana Boyenga , assistant superintendent , Atwater ESD , Region 9 ; Craig Helmstedter , superintendent , Ocean View SD , Region 13 ; and Angel Barrett , executive director C & I , Los Angeles USD , Region 16 .
Sue Kaiser , assistant superintendent for educational services , Monrovia USD , has been reappointed to serve as director for Region 15 . Region-appointed directors generally serve three-year terms . Kaiser
See LEADERS , page 8
Education California | The official newspaper of the Association of California School Administrators Volume 46 | Number 31 | May 30, 2016 Legislature’s plans for budget emerge As the Legislature begins to move toward the June 15 constitutional deadline to produce a 2016-17 state budget, committees in both the Assembly and Senate are wrapping up their hearings on various spending plans. ACSA Legislative Advocate Martha Alvarez provided the following updates on some key budget proposals that have emerged since Gov. Jerry Brown released his May Revision. In response to the governor’s budget and as part of the relatively short process to finalize the 2016-17 Budget Act, the Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee adopted its Proposition 98 budget package on May 24, while the Assembly Budget Committee took major actions on May 26. •  Local Control Funding Formula: The governor increased his January figure for LCFF funding  by $154 million for a new total of $2.979 billion for school districts and charters, thus getting local education agencies to 95.7 percent of their full funding targets. The Assembly approved LCFF gap funding at $3.054 billion and the Senate increased LCFF funding to $3.085 billion in 2016-17. • Mandate Reimbursement Payments: The governor increased one-time discretionary Prop. 98 mandate repayments for school districts, charter schools and county offices of education to $1.416 billion – $237 per ADA. The Assembly decreased one-time mandate payments to  $1.25 billion, and the Senate decreased payments to See BUDGET, page 2 Negotiators Retreat adds key speaker Students learn specific skills in vehicle maintenance, as well as valuable workforce lessons in a program led by classified leaders at the Shasta County Office of Education. Mentoring program enriches student skills in Shasta County When people are interested in entering a particular job field, the recommendation often is to find a mentor, someone experienced in the field who can show you the ins and outs. ACSA runs a mentoring program for new principals and superintendents, featuring a group of mentors who have extensive experience in the field. But mentorship can also apply to high school students. Dan Coyne, vehicle maintenance coordinator for the Shasta County Office of Education oversees a mentorship program for students that has operated in the county office for almost 20 years. “Dan is an excellent example of our classified leaders at the Shasta County Office of Education. He goes out of his way to provide opportunities for at-risk students,” said ACSA President and Shasta COE Superintendent Tom Armelino. “We consider ourselves fortunate to be able to offer some real, handson career educational opportunities to help students experience the work world. “Even if students do not choose to go on to a career in the field of mechanics, they have an opportunity to learn valuable lessons – such as working with others, showing up on time, planning and providing quality work – that will serve them in whatever field they ultimately go into.” Coyne said the numbers of students the county works with can ebb and flow each year, the programs students are interested in can change, as well as the time mentors are available, but the program keeps moving on. “I would say we have seen 40 to 50 students go through the shop,” Coyne said. “I am sure it may be more than that if I were to really dig through history.” Coyne said the culture at Shasta COE and the personnel who work there make mentoring students something that comes naturally. “As technology changes, we are constantly learning and evolving here in the shop, and our mechanics love to pass that learning on,” he said. “We have a group of mechanics who see the value See SHASTA, page 5 ACSA Educational Services announced the addition of Ryan Smith of the Edu­ cation Trust-West as a keynote speaker for the upcoming Negotiators Planning Retreat in La Quinta. Smith, who has served as EdTrust executive director since October 2014, is expected to address the equity and meaningful engagement issues inherent in the new Local Control Funding Formula. The Negotiators Planning Retreat is designed to offer successful strategies to negotiators for California school district collective bargaining. Smith This hands-on event helps participants develop plans for accomplishing such Local Control and Accountability Plan goals as communications, negotiating and accountability. At EdTrust-West, the recently released report “Black Minds Matter: Supporting the Educational Success of Black Children in California” examines the disparities in achievement at all levels of their educational journey. The report also highlights the groundbreaking efforts under way to reverse these trends in California and close achievement and opportunity gaps for African American students. Smith is dedicated to closing opportunity and achievement gaps for students of color and students living in poverty. He was named by Education Week as one of 10 Education Leaders to Watch nationally and also received the Families in Schools’ Parent Engagement Leader of the Year Award. The Negotiators Planning Retreat features experts in essential areas, including audits; communication and outreach; labor, Graduation rates. The California Department of Education reports the state’s cohort graduation rate climbed for the sixth year in a row in 2015 to a record high, with the biggest jump among English Learners and migrant students. Among students who started high school in 2011-12, 82.3 percent graduated with their class in 2015, up 1.3 percentage points from the year before. 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