DOZ Issue 35 September 2018 - Page 38

“ When I arrived home, I instructed my maid to bring the clothes out of the car, and I went in search of my husband, the best man in the world. He was in Angel’s room, playing with her. a laughing stock and relocated to Asaba where he ran into Mr. Sunday, his former laundry man whose business was booming. Initially, Mr. Sunday assisted him with money to buy food to eat, but after a while he offered Andrew a job as his laundry man with a meager salary and a place to stay. The offer appeared good to Andrew and he accepted it. Thus, Andrew, who once gave clothes to Mr. Sunday to wash, began to wash clothes for Mr. Sunday in exchange for a meager salary and a roof over his head. It was such a pathetic story and I felt sorry for him. As he finished telling his story, he began to weep like a little child and begged me to take away the curse I placed on him so he could begin to do well once again. I told him, “I placed no curse on you, Andrew. God bears me witness that this is the truth. I already forgave you a long time ago. But we are here now, and I forgive you again.” I pronounced a blessing upon his life. Then I opened my purse and brought out my checkbook and wrote him a check for something that would enable him to get back on his feet and out of Mr. Sunday’s employment. As I wrote, I was confident that when I mentioned it to Ray, he would not be angry with me because he constantly spoke to me about forgiveness and helping others who were less privileged. Andrew almost fainted at the figure on the check leaflet and profusely expressed his gratitude. He was very grateful. Mr. Sunday, however, was not because he would obviously have to look for another staff. I didn’t care. I did what I believed God wanted me to do, and I was at peace. « 38 DOZ Magazine September 2018 As I drove back home, having collected my husband’s clothes, I reflected on my encounter with Andrew and his ordeal, and not for the first time, I was grateful to God for the wonderful man I married. More importantly, I was grateful I had not married Andrew, after seeing him again almost ten years later. I began to ask myself why I ever thought I loved him. Andrew was a deceptive, selfish, and self-centered man, and what he met was not a curse from me but the fruit of the seed he planted. When I arrived home, I instructed my maid to bring the clothes out of the car, and I went in search of my husband, the best man in the world. He was in Angel’s room, playing with her. I approached him from behind, wrapped my arms around him and held on tight, as though my life depended on it. As my mouth said the words, “I love you so much, Ray,” my heart said a million thanks to the God who had taken Andrew out of my life and given me a better man, Raymond. Nneka. -The End-