Cutting Edge Issue 2 - Page 40

Nakayama demonstrating kendo kata at the Noma dojo sleeping but a few hours in order to attend five or six practice sessions a day. Hakudo traveled extensively throughout Japan studying various schools His dedication eventually paid off however, and he quickly advanced through the ranks. In 1895, he received his first mokuroku from Shingoro, and four years later received the second, jun-menkyo. By 1904 he had received the highest certificate menkyo, from Shingoro. During the following couple of years, he fought in many bouts against highly skilled swordsman, which came to define his early career as an individual of exceptional skill. Such was Nakayama’s skill, even corporate Japan were asking for his patronage. In 1912, Koyata Iwasaki, the then President of the Mitsubishi Limited Partnership Corporation, constructed a kendojo at his Surugadai estate, and invited Nakayama to be the head of the dojo, leading the kendo practice for company members. By the age of twenty-eight, he was named Daihan or “Acting Headmaster”, had married Shingoro’s daughter and was adopted into the Negishi family*. Nakayama traveled extensively throughout Japan studying various schools. In his search he found two in particular that would set the course of his life – Shinto Muso Ryu (jo) and Muso Shinden Eishin Ryu (iai). He began training in Shinto Muso Ryu Jojutsu and shodo (calligraphy) under 38 | CUTTING EDGE Uchida Ryogoro and with Takeda Kohachi in Tokyo. He trained hard, finding his study of the jo to be among the most interesting and valuable of his pursuits. Nakayama later wrote: “As a youth I was taught Shinto Muso Ryu by Uchida Ryogoro Shihan. It was through this training that I came to understand the inner principals and methods of kendo. I learned the ins and the outs of handling the jo, the placement of the feet, body mechanics, and other fundamentals. Even in my kendo practice, I was able to utilise and cultivate these jo techniques. Thanks to this practice I gained a lot of knowledge. In the world of martial arts there are no kata as thoroughly developed as the Shinto Muso Ryu Jojutsu’s. I believe the Shinto Muso Ryu jojutsu is one of our national treasures.”* Itagaki Taisuke confided in Nakayama, that, without study, research and intensive practice in the province of Tosa, his techniques would always be incomplete and open for further perfection. Following a demonstration in 1916, the famous Shindo Munen Ryu instructor Itagaki Taisuke (1837-1919), confided in Nakayama, that, without study, research and intensive practice in the province of Tosa, his techniques would always be incomplete and open for further perfection. Nakayama was keen to gain an insight into the real iai, so after Nakayama’s persistence, Itagaki Taisuke agreed to introduce him to a Sensei from Tosa. The recommendation was to Yukimune Sadayoshi of Tosa, but he refused to take him on as a student, since he wasn’t originally from Tosa. “Dejected”, Nakayama was about to return to Tokyo, when Oe Masamichi, t ?RgWGW&RwF?6??R?bF?RF???W&???FR7VvvW7F????( ?7F'F??p?F???'&?r??v????fRB?"RF?0??bV&?2FV???7G&F???2??BWfV??F??Vv??W"6V???2f?&&?BW2F??6??r??RF?R&V?v??bF?R7v?&B????R6?7F???6??R?BvF6???FV???7G&F???2?F?R??FW2?B?V&??'?vF6???r?( ??R?6?6???Bv?fV??????F?R??'GV??G??R6?FW7W&FV????