Current Pedorthics January-February 2017 | Vol.49, Issue 1 - Page 26

Pedorthics for Winter Sports
" Common foot problems like metatarsalgia can often be addressed with an insert that provides metatarsal and longitudinal arch support , much as you would in a running shoe ."

Pedorthics for Winter Sports

While many of the foot issues we encounter daily are the same for these activities , the approach to problem solving can be quite different . Here are some tips for dealing with winter sport specific footwear .
Snowshoeing is a sport where the footwear can be anything from insulated pack boots to hiking boots to running shoes . As a full gait sport in snow , the footwear must provide protection from the cold as well as moisture . The boots or shoes should have adequate width in the forefoot to accommodate heavier socks without squeezing the metatarsal heads together and there needs to be ample toe box space to allow for good blood flow and movement of the toes for warmth . I highly recommend Merino wool socks for their insulating properties and comfort when damp . Common foot problems like metatarsalgia can often be addressed with an insert that provides metatarsal and longitudinal arch support , much as you would in a running shoe . Leg length discrepancies can be addressed with in shoe lifts or external shoe modifications . Snowshoers with vascular problems should select footwear that provides added warmth to protect against frostbite .
Ice skates can be notoriously uncomfortable . Stiff soled , tight fitting skates can exacerbate foot problems like hallux valgus , accessory navicular pain , tailor ’ s bunions and pump bumps . Although there are two types of ice skates , hockey and figure , I generally address foot problems the same in both . Aside from the performance

" Common foot problems like metatarsalgia can often be addressed with an insert that provides metatarsal and longitudinal arch support , much as you would in a running shoe ."

benefits of longitudinal arch support , which helps transfer power to the skate blade by controlling pronatory foot motion , many of the typical fit issues in skates are well addressed with inserts , either custom or offthe-shelf ( OTS ). Most modern skates have a thin sock liner that can be removed to make room for a supportive device but that device needs to be very low profile . I prefer a stiff nylon or carbon shell with a very shallow heel cup and narrow grind that allows the orthotic to sit deeply into the skate . I use a 2mm top cover and a 2mm forefoot
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24 Pedorthic Footcare Association www . pedorthics . org