Creating Genius Magazine Winter Issue - Page 53

education for the better. It’s something we have to keep learning and implementing at the same time. We must also continue to inspire entrepreneurs to innovate education in Shiza: We believe in the power of local leaders and entrepreneurs and aim to support and amplify their work through our partnerships. the Malala Fund invests in early stage or small organizations that are led by these local entrepreneurs in areas where girls don't have access to education. CG: So you are basically acting as a catalyst to expand The Malala Fund’s reach and impact in places otherwise inaccessible? Shiza: That’s right. Our partners are entrepreneurs and leaders who have proven their concepts, but need funding to attain some level of scale and eventually be able to apply to the bigger VCs and investors. We make grants that help their organizations scale their impact to lead to systems level change in the country. Megan Smith, one of our founding board members and Vice President at Google, explains this well. She says, “If you take someone from 200 years ago and insert them into a today’s world they’d be completely shocked at all the drastic changes, but if you insert them into a classroom it will look almost exactly the same.” CG: What are your plans with the Malala Fund going forward? Shiza: Going forward, we must continuously innovate in order to change their own communities. We are devoted to getting access to education for girls all over the world, but we can’t do it all by ourselves. The Fund's goal is to disperse between eight and ten investments per year to entrepreneurs working to increase access to education, from Asia to Africa to Latin America.  “If you take someone from 200 years ago and insert them into today’s world they’d be completely shocked at all the drastic changes, but if you insert them into a classroom it would look almost exactly the same.” On October 10, 2014, Malala Yousafzai won The Nobel Peace Prize in recognition of her unwavering courage and “heroic struggle” for girls’ access to education in spite of extremist views.