CRAFT by Under My Host® Issue No. 15 Classics - Page 116

key . Right now , the whiskey is young , a white whiskey , but they are also aging it in American oak for release at a later date . The flavor is very corn forward , like tamal and tortillas . Sounds pretty wonderful , no ?
It isn ’ t just our cocktails benefiting from this ancestral corn revival , but chefs are getting in on the action .
When they introduced their whiskey in Chicago , Rick Bayless who was a skeptic of the white whiskey at first , became a fan . As it turns out he is trying to revive native corn in Illinois as well as lending a hand in Oaxaca . Bayless isn ’ t the only chef onboard , chefs in NYC and Oakland are using ancestral corn in their restaurants . This helps in the fight against GMO corn because to fight it , reviving traditional dishes , from posoles to tamales and beyond , using these products educates consumers and strengthens the market .
From whiskey to the humble tortilla , corn is an important part of Oaxacan life . Barbieri and
to take matters into his own hands .
At Pierde Almas , they buy corn from five farms across Oaxaca to use for their whiskey . The yellow corn from a region called Chinantla in the jungle on the Vera Cruz side of Oaxaca , and one of the densest jungles in MX . Here many growers are abandoning corn to raise cattle , impacting the surrounding terrain . Their black corn comes from 10,000 feet up in the Sierra Arrzo Negro , it takes a long time to grow , with the stalks reaching up to 14 feet high . The white and red corn from the central valley of Oaxaca . Other than that , they use malted barley is used for its enzymes , with no extras added .
The mash bill is 96 % corn and 4 % malted barley . Within that 96 %, the corn variety amounts will vary . This essentially creates a snapshot of the corn harvest in Oaxaca at that point in time , not unlike the concept of terroir . Giving you a difference in “ vintage ,” with each year . Other factors that affect the flavor , include things like temperature , weather . They celebrate diversity in booze . The whiskey will always taste like whis-
key. Right now, the whiskey is young, a white whiskey, but they are also aging it in American oak for release at a later date. The flavor is very corn forward, like tamal and tortillas. Sounds pretty wonderful, no? It isn’t just our cocktails benefiting from this an- cestral corn revival, but chefs are getting in on the action. When they introduced their whiskey in Chica- go, Rick Bayless who was a skeptic of the white whiskey at first, became a fan. As it turns out he is trying to revive native corn in Illinois as well as lending a hand in Oaxaca. Bayless isn’t the only chef onboard, chefs in NYC and Oakland are us- ing ancestral corn in their restaurants. This helps in the fight against GMO corn because to fight it, reviving traditional dishes, from posoles to tamales and beyond, using these products ed- ucates consumers and strengthens the market. From whiskey to the humble tortilla, corn is an important part of Oaxacan life. Barbieri and to take matters into his own hands. At Pierde Almas, they buy corn from ٔɵ)ɽ́=ᅍѼ͔ȁѡȁݡͭ丁Q啰)܁ɸɽɕ ѱѡ)չѡYɄ ͥ=ᅍ)ѡ͕Ёչ́5`!ɔ䁝ɽݕ)ɔɸѼɅ͔ѱѥ)ѡɽչѕɅQȁɸ)ɽЁѡMɄ鼁9ɼ)х́ѥѼɽܰݥѠѡх́ɕ)ѼЁЁQݡєɕɸ)ɽѡɅم䁽=ᅍ=ѡȁѡ)ѡаѡ͔ѕɱ䁥͕́ȁ́)嵕̰ݥѠɅ́)Q̀ؔ͠ɸДѕɱ)]ѡѡЀؔѡɸمɥ䁅չ́ݥ)م丁Q͕́ѥ䁍ɕѕ́͹͡Ёѡ)ɸٕЁ=ᅍЁѡЁЁѥ)ЁչѡЁѕɽȸ٥ԁ)ɕq٥хtݥѠ啅ȸ=ѡ)ѽ́ѡЁЁѡٽȰՑѡ́)ѕɅɔݕѡȸQ䁍Ʌєٕͥ)锸Qݡͭݥ݅́хєݡ̴