CR3 News Magazine 2018 February: Black History Special Edition - Page 52

Causes of Lung Cancer: Lung cancer has always been – and still is – more common in men. As more women have started smoking, the number of women developing lung cancer has been on the increase. People who do not smoke can also develop lung cancer. Approximately 10–15% of people who get lung cancer have never smoked. Other risk factors include the effects of past cancer treatment and exposure to asbestos, radon gas and – in very rare cases – substances such as uranium, chromium and nickel. Lung cancer is not infectious and can’t be passed on to other people. Smoking - The more one smokes, the greater the risk of developing lung cancer. It is also more likely to develop in people who start smoking at a young age. If someone stops smoking, their risk of developing lung cancer falls quite quickly. After about 15 years, the chance of developing the disease is similar to that of a non-smoker. This section on smoking includes the use of: • Hookah • e-Hookah

Researched and Authored by Prof Michael C Herbst [D Litt et Phil (Health Studies); D N Ed; M Art et Scien; B A Cur; Dip Occupational Health] Approved by Ms Elize Joubert, Chief Executive Officer [BA Social Work (cum laude); MA Social Work] May 2017

Nunc molestie sapien leo, sed placerat ipsum suscipit ut. Proin magna nunc.

Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA)

Causes of Lung Cancer Lung cancer has always been – and still is – more common in men. As more women have started smoking, the number of women developing lung cancer has been on the increase. People who do not smoke can also develop lung cancer. Approximately 10–15% of people who get lung cancer have never smoked. Other risk factors include the effects of past cancer treatment and exposure to asbestos, radon gas and – in very rare cases – substances such as uranium, chromium and nickel. Lung cancer is not infectious and can’t be passed on to other people. Smoking - The more one smokes, the greater the risk of developing lung cancer. It is also more likely to develop in people who start smoking at a young age. If someone stops smoking, their risk of developing lung cancer falls quite quickly. After about 15 years, the chance of developing the disease is similar to that of a non-smoker. This section on smoking includes the use of: • Hookah • e-Hookah

Researched and Authored by Prof Michael C Herbst [D Litt et Phil (Health Studies); D N Ed; M Art et Scien; B A Cur; Dip Occupational Health] Approved by Ms Elize Joubert, Chief Executive Officer [BA Social Work (cum laude); MA Social Work] May 2017

www.cansa.org.za

Research . Educate . Support

Lowering the Risk for

Lung Cancer

Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA)

Fact Sheet on Lung Cancer May 2017

Lung cancer prevention is a critical topic, since lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in men and women worldwide. It is estimated that the risk for lung cancer can be lowered in 90% of cases through action and awareness. Smoking accounts for the majority of preventable lung cancers, but non smokers can take action to lower their risk as well. Those who have already been diagnosed with lung cancer should not despair. Some of these measures have been shown to improve survival after lung cancer is already present.

Smoking cessation

Smoking is responsible for the majority of lung cancers. Quitting all forms of smoking at any time can lower the risk of developing lung cancer, and appears to be beneficial after a diagnosis of lung cancer as well.

Radon exposure

Exposure to radon in the home is the second leading cause of lung cancer overall, and

the number one cause in non smokers.

Radon is an invisible radioactive

gas that results from the normal

decay of radium in the soil.

Secondhand smoke

Exposure to second hand

smoke increases the risk

of lung cancer in non-

smokers two to three fold.

Asbestos

Workplace exposure to

asbestos increases the

risk of lung cancer, and

combined with smoking

the risk is exponential.

Employers should have

safety recommendations

for those exposed.

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