Country Images Magazine North Edition November 2017 - Page 37

Above : A ten-item mixed lot , £ 60-100 [ Bamfords Ltd .] Below : A 25 item mixed lot , also £ 60-100 [ Bamfords Ltd .]
Above : The match I didn ’ t see : Derby County versus Crystal Palace , two days before Christmas 1967 . [ Private collection ]
Above right : Typical Crystal Palace programme from the mid-1950s . [ Private collection ]
Right : Match card : Everton vs Derby County 1890 [ Private collection ]
made them octavo , or even ‘ pocket ’ sized , but increasingly embellished with photographs , and this continued during the following decade with increasing amounts of colour and arresting designs appearing in the 1970s , when printing firms often produced programmes for a number of teams , although this era also ushered in great fluctuations in size .
From the 1990s there has been a gradual expansion of content and the introduction of glossy finishes , producing something much closer to souvenir standard , and of course the more durable for it . Today they are almost all A4 sized and often 48 / 96 pages long .
The older the programme , the higher will be its value , but scarcity introduces an element of uncertainty . Generally speaking programmes from before the 1970s are worth more than those dating from later , where £ 1.50- £ 5 is the norm . In the more recent era , it is postponed matches and replays which can increase the price , whilst programmes from the 1940s tend to command prices of £ 10 or more , with from £ 30 to near £ 100 being the norm for the preceding two decades .
Cup finals , of course are much more sought after , testimonial matches honouring retiring players of real stature and first matches under notable managers , also add a premium . For instance the match I attended at Derby was a very early Clough / Taylor one , a fact of which I was , of course , blissfully ignorant . A programme for the 1882 FA Cup Final made £ 35,250 at auction four years ago , whilst the previous highest price ( Spurs v Sheffield United 1901 FA Cup final at Crystal Palace ) was £ 14,400 and the Cup Final programme for 1924 made £ 6,500 . For the Derby County supporter the real nirvana is the 1946 cup-final programme ( Derby beat Charlton Athletic 4-1 in extra time by the way ). This was the first after the war , making it collectible for a constituency well outside Rams fans , and the only final ever contested by Derby . A clean example might cost you
( judging by more recent auction results ) between £ 175 and £ 240 .
Football programmes are fairly easy to store ( although modern ones take up an obscene amount of shelf-space compared to pre-1990s ones ) and if one sticks to post-1950 examples , on the whole it is an inexpensive hobby , apart from misprints , typos and other defects as-sold , which tend to add to the price .
Oh , and if you had a past member of the family fairly wedded to spending Saturday afternoons getting pneumonia at the local football ground , search the loft : there might conceivably be a dusty old box of old programmes waiting to be liberated onto the market !

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CountryImagesMagazine . co . uk | 37
Above: A ten-item mixed lot, £60-100 [Bamfords Ltd.] Below: A 25 item mixed lot, also £60-100 [Bamfords Ltd.] Above: Th e match I didn’t see: Derby County versus Crystal Palace, two days before Christmas 1967. [Private collection] Above right: Typical Crystal Palace programme from the mid-1950s. [Private collection] Right: Match card: Everton vs Derby County 1890 [Private collection] made them octavo, or even ‘pocket’ sized, but increasingly embellished with photographs, and this continued during the following decade with increasing amounts of colour and arresting designs appearing in the 1970s, when printing fi rms oft en produced programmes for a number of teams, although this era also ushered in great fl uctuations in size. From the 1990s there has been a gradual expansion of content and the introduction of glossy fi nishes, producing something much closer to souvenir standard, and of course the more durable for it. Today they are almost all A4 sized and oft en 48/96 pages long. Th e older the programme, the higher will be its value, but scarcity introduces an element of uncertainty. Generally speaking programmes from before the 1970s are worth more than those dating from later, where £1.50-£5 is the norm. In the more recent era, it is postponed matches and replays which can increase the price, whilst programmes from the 1940s tend to command prices of £10 or more, with from £30 to near £100 being the norm for the preceding two decades. Cup fi nals, of course are much more sought aft er, testimonial matches honouring retiring players of real stature and fi rst matches under notable managers, also add a premium. For instance the э$ѕ)ɉٕ݅́䁕ɱ ՝Q屽ȁЁݡ$̰݅)͔͙ձ䁥ɅиɽɅȁѡȁ + ԰ЁՍѥȁ啅́ݡЁѡɕ٥́ЁɥM)؁MUѕā Ё хA݅̃ а)ѡ ɽɅȀЁ ذȁѡɉ չ)ѕȁѡɕم́ѡ؁ɽɅɉ䁉) ɱѽѡѥдāɄѥѡ݅䤸Q́݅́ѡЁЁȁѡ)݅ȰЁѥȁѥՕݕͥḬ́)ѡ䁙ٕȁѕѕɉ丁ᅵЁЁ(Ց䁵ɔɕЁՍѥɕձ̤ݕ ԁ )щɽɅ́ɔɱ䁕Ѽѽɔѡ՝ɸ́х)͍չЁ͡ɕѼɔ̤́)ѥ́Ѽдᅵ̰ѡݡЁ́ͥٔ)Ёɽɥ̰́ѡȁ̵́ͽݡѕѼѼ)ѡɥ)=ԁЁȁѡ䁙ɱݕѼ)Mɑ䁅Ёɹ́ѥյЁѡщɽչ͕ɍ)ѡЀѡɔЁم䁉䁽ɽɅ)݅ѥѼɅѕѼѡɭЄ)͉ɹ)Y )ѥՔ )IѽɅѥ(I)AͽՅɥɕȁ͕٥)A͔хЁ́ѼɅ٥ͥЁѼȁ)ȁIمՅѥսхѥ(Ȁ)ٍ) ͕Ёͥ ) չ%5饹լ