Cosmopolitan June 2018 - Page 101

As lagom isn ’ t the first Scandi trend we ’ ve grabbed , we got thinking : does switching to a new cultural norm hinder or help us ?
“ It ’ s partly a result of globalisation ,” explains social scientist Dr Lauren Rosewarne from the University of Melbourne . “ We ’ re exposed to so many different cultures and we can buy all the accouterments we need to have that lifestyle .”
It ’ s true . We love another country ’ s way of life , and these days , they ’ re so easy to embrace . Years ago , we cottoned onto the Japanese way of eating . Until we realised that our diet couldn ’ t sustain such high consumption of soy . Then we threw out all our belongings because Marie Kondo said it would make us feel better .
“ We go through the trends in lifestyles where we look at people who seem to be happier , healthier or better than us and we ask ourselves , what we can learn ,” says Dr Lauren . “ That ’ s human nature . The problem is there are a lot of limitations in cherry-picking from other cultures and then expecting it to work the same in isolation . Minimalism , like with lagom , has an aesthetic charm — if we have less stuff we ’ ll be happier . This has a short life span because people purge and then they don ’ t feel joyful after that .”
Lagom is an interesting one , though , as Gen Y has never really been friends with moderation . There are the hipsters , who think it ’ s okay to ride an `18,000 Fixie bike because they ’ re saving the environment , and then there ’ s the rest of us spending our retirement on cold-drip Colombian ( so says that recent study on 18-34-year-olds that found we spend more on coffee than any sort of savings or investment for later life ). And don ’ t even get the patriarchy started on our

THE LIFESTYLE TRENDS WE FAILED

uHYGGE : As mentioned in this article here , hygge ( pronounced ‘ hoo-gah ’) was all about comfort and cosiness . If you buy into every article written about it , you ’ d be forgiven for thinking it has three main facets : hot chocolates , rugs and fireplaces . So , basically , think of some ski chalet turned up to 11 and you ’ ve got hygge . And hot flushes .
U GLUGGAVEDUR : The English of Gluggavedur , which is Icelandic for ‘ windowweather ’. In a nutshell , it means weather that is nice to look at through a window but not nice to be out in . In practicality , any time you look at through a window and think it looks calming compared to being outside in it and having your brolly immediately turn inside-out .
U KONDO : Marie Kondo , a Japanese organisation expert , taught us to throw out all of our sh * t unless it brought us joy . And we did . Until we realised we ’ d got into a tizzy , got a little too excited , and purged half our house . That was an expensive month of replacing stuff ...
U FRENCH : No buzzword , just literally our obsession with anything ‘ French ’ meant we fell in love with carbs and butter , and got kicked out of way too many restaurants for lighting up a cigarette . No ? Just us ?
FOR MORE GREAT STORIES , VISIT COSMO . IN JUNE 2018 COSMOPOLITAN 101
As lagom isn’t the first Scandi trend we’ve grabbed, we got thinking: does switching to a new cultural norm hinder or help us? “It’s partly a result of globalisation,” explains social scientist Dr Lauren Rosewarne from the University of Melbourne. “We’re exposed to so many different cultures and we can buy all the accouterments we need to have that lifestyle.” It’s true. We love another country’s way of life, and these days, they’re so easy to embrace. Years ago, we cottoned onto the Japanese way of eating. Until we realised that our diet couldn’t sustain such high consumption of soy. Then we threw out all our belongings because Marie Kondo said it would make us feel better. “We go through the trends in lifestyles where we look at people who seem to be happier, healthier or better than us and we ask ourselves, what we can learn,” says Dr Lauren. “That’s human nature. The problem is there are a lot of limitations in cherry-picking from other cultures and then expecting it to work the same in isolation. Minimalism, like with lagom, has an aesthetic charm—if we have less stuff we’ll be happier. This has a short life span because people purge and then they don’t feel joyful after that.” Lagom is an interesting one, though, as Gen Y has never really been friends with moderation. There are the hipsters, who think it’s okay to ride an `18,000 Fixie bike because they’re saving the environment, and then there’s the rest of us spending our retirement on cold-drip Colombian (so says that recent study on 18-34-year-olds that found we spend more on coffee than any sort of savings or investment for later life). And don’t even get the patriarchy started on our THE LIFESTYLE TRENDS WE FAILED uHYGGE: As mentioned in this article here, hygge (pronounced ‘hoo-gah’) was all about comfort and cosiness. If you buy into every article written about it, you’d be forgiven for thinking it has three main facets: hot chocolates, rugs and fireplaces. So, basically, think of some ski chalet turned up to 11 and you’ve got hygge. And hot flushes. U GLUGGAVEDUR: The English of Gluggavedur, which is Icelandic for ‘window- weather’. In a nutshell, it means weather that is nice to look at through a window but not nice to be out in. In practicality, any time you look at through a window FOR MORE GREAT STORIES, VISIT COSMO.IN and think it looks calming compared to being outside in it and having your brolly immediately turn inside-out. U KONDO: Marie Kondo, a Japanese organisation expert, taught us to throw out all of our sh*t unless it brought us joy. And we did. Until we realised we’d got into a tizzy, go H]H^]Y [\Y[\\K]\[^[]B[۝و\X[œYHS˜^ܙ \]\[B\؜\[ۈ][][8&[8&HYX[H[[ݙH]\˜[]\[XY]و^H›X[H\]\[܂Y[\HY\]K\\’Sx" NSUSL