Conference News July/August 2017 - Page 44

44 Disability Dealing with disability Christopher Cashman, sales & events manager at London venue LSO St Luke’s, gives an overview on dealing with disability at venues and events key trait of being a good events organiser is an ability to see things from another person’s point of view. Considering what guests may feel, want or require, and anticipating any requests before they arrive is essential for ensuring everyone’s needs are accounted for. Venues need to make certain they are accessible to people with a range of needs. These can be physical, such as wheelchair users, those with visual or hearing impairments or who tire easily or find stairs difficult. However, you should also carefully consider the access needs of those with ‘invisible disabilities’. This could be anything from a learning disability, to those with epilepsy. This is where being able to put yourself in other people’s shoes really comes in handy. It’s simple enough to consider the things that “It’s simple enough to consider the things that you might like to arrive to, but it requires much more thought when planning for others you might like to arrive to, but it requires much more thought when planning for others. Many factors can make what you see as a relatively stress-free experience, extremely difficult for someone with a disability. As an able-bodied person, how often do you stop to consider whether a venue will have stairs before arriving or if it will offer braille signage? Have you ever deliberated whether it is worth the effort to even attend an event ͔ѕѥ)́ݥѠͥ)܁܁ѡЁͽѡ͔)ѥٕ́иQمЁɥ)ٕȁ́Ѽѕєѡ͔)ѡ̰Ёȁٕɽӊé)ՍЁѡ%٥є)ݥѠͅѥ́ѼѕЁȁٕՔ)Q䁅ɔȁɔՅѼ͍)ѡȁ́ȁ̸ͥ)Ё1M