Clay Times Back Issues Vol. 21 Issue 99 - Winter/Spring 2015 - Page 41

is a high-fire clay maturing at around 1770˚C (3218˚F, or Orton cone 32). While gold prospector Jack Angel had inspired her, well-known BC potter Wayne Ngan provided professional mentorship. When the mineral rights for the deposit were allowed to lapse, Carlson applied for and was successful in gaining the title to the claim. Since then, she has had to work patiently to overcome the barrier of the landholders’ resistance to her accessing the mineral claim. Driven by the challenge of sourcing her own ceramic materials for clay and glazes, Carlson eventually developed a bright, lemony, butterscotch pudding-colored flashing clay body that she proudly calls “Angel Clay”. Although she still maintains other financial streams of income to make ends meet, Carlson self-describes as an artist. Her other jobs merely support her primary job of being an artist, she says. In recent years, Carlson has attended artist residencies at MEDALTA in Medicine Hat, Alberta, and The Pottery Workshop in Jingdezhen, China. Her experiences with Blue & White (QingBai) brush painting in China opened her to a new, more gestural approach to glazing greenware. Over time, Carlson has gained vast empirical knowledge through trial and error, observation of the results, and discussions with experts. Yet she is not solely interested in the technical aspects of her creative process. Like many ceramic artists, she feels disappointed that rigidity of fired works can make them appear static and inaccessible. At that somewhat cathartic stage, With materials testing under the guidance of Trudy Golley at Red Deer College, Carlson developed a more durable cone 10 clay body. the form has lost its most compelling characteristic: its potential. “My favorite part of making,” Carlson says, “is when it’s still fresh, wet clay. The moisture in the clay — it’s so alive, so beautiful!” For Carlson, leather-hard clay is dormant; bisqued ware is dead. “It’s always trying to get back to the original beauty of the moist clay,” she says. Wood firing, she has found, can be used to reanimate her forms. Carlson creates forms with the intention of manipulating the way they engage the flame path during the firing process. The colors in her work depend on the various mixes of clay bodies and firing processes used; the work can be even more colorful should she choose to apply terra sigillatas, flashing slips, or glazes before the firing. At home with the commercial aspects of pottery and mindful of the relationship that exists between the finished work and the end user, Carlson endeavors to make work that speaks primarily to her own aesthetic and draws like-minded buyers to it. An adventuresome spirit, Carlson is a risk taker who willingly accepts the challenge of the unknown for the gifts that it brings. Having hosted Red Deer College Ceramics instructor Trudy Golley during a two-day workshop for the Prince George Potters’ Guild, Carlson found that her path and Golley’s crossed again more recently at The Pottery Workshop in Jingdezhen, China. During one of their conversations, Carlson said she wanted to devote time to access specialized technical assistance in order to develop a workable clay body for slip-casting, and to soda-fire the resulting body of work at Medalta in Medicine Hat, Alberta. Golley responded with an invitation to a seven-week artist residency in the Ceramics Studio at Red Deer College. Carlson accepted. “The time I spent in Red Deer,” Carlson says, “was to research and refine my clay body to be stronger and more durable at cone 10. I also learned about mould making and casting. “Trudy Golley facilitated my work,” she continued, “and we reached our goal of developing a cone 10 casting slip. I look forward to using this slip and working out some of the ideas I had while I was in China.” Following her residency at RDC, Carlson traveled to Medalta in Medicine Hat, Alberta, to soda-fire and complete her body of work. She has since participated in a four-person exhibition in Nanjing, China. Carlson now looks forward to further experimentation with soda firing at home. [ CLAYTIMES·COM n WINTER / SPRING 2015 41 is a high-fire clay maturing at around 1770˚C (3218˚F, or Orton cone 32). finished work and the end user, Carlson endeavors to make work that speaks primarily to her own aesthetic and draws like-minded buyers to it. CLAYTIMES·COM n WINTER / SPRING 2015 While gold prospector Jack Angel had inspired her, well-known BC potter Wayne Ngan provided An adventuresome spirit, professional mentorship. Carlson is a risk taker who When the mineral rights for willingly accepts the chalthe deposit were allowed to lenge of the unknown for lapse, Carlson applied for the gifts that it brings. Havand was successful in gaining hosted Red Deer College ing the title to the claim. Ceramics instructor Trudy Since then, she has had to Golley during a two-day workwork patiently to overcome shop for the Prince George the barrier of the landholdPotters’ Guild, Carlson found ers’ resistance to her acthat her path and Golley’s cessing the mineral claim. crossed again more recently Driven by the challenge of at The Pottery Workshop in sourcing her own ceramic Jingdezhen, China. During materials for clay and one of their conversations, glazes, Carlson eventually With materials testing under the guidance of Trudy Golley at Red Carlson said she wanted to Deer College, Carlson developed a more durable cone 10 clay body. developed a bright, lemony, devote time to access spebutterscotch pudding-colcialized technical assistance ored flashing clay body that the form has lost its most compelin order to develop a workshe proudly calls “Angel Clay”. ling characteristic: its potential. able clay body for slip-casting, and to soda-fire the resulting body of work Although she still maintains other “My favorite part of making,” Carlson at Medalta in Medicine Hat, Alberta. financial streams of income to make says, “is when it’s still fresh, wet clay. Golley responded with an invitation ends meet, Carlson self-describes The moisture in the clay — it’s so to a seven-week artist residency in as an artist. Her other jobs merely alive, so beautiful!” the Ceramics Studio at Red Deer Colsupport her primary job of being an lege. Carlson accepted. artist, she says. For Carlson, leather-hard clay is dormant; bisqued ware is dead. “The time I spent in Red Deer,” CarlIn recent years, Carlson has attended “It’s always trying to get back to the son says, “was to research and refine artist residencies at MEDALTA in original beauty of the moist clay,” my clay body to be stronger and more Medicine Hat, Alberta, and The Pot- she says. durable at con $ͼɹ)ѕ]ɭ͡)顕 )Ёձѥ)!ȁɥ́ݥѠ Ք]є]ɥ́͡չ(E ͠ѥ ͕Ѽɕєȁɵ̸ ɰqQՑ䁙хѕݽɬt)ȁѼܰɔɅͽɕѕ́ɵ́ݥѠѡѕѥ͡ѥՕqݔɕ)ɽѼ饹ɕ݅ɔ)ձѥѡ݅ѡ䁕ٕѥ)ѡѠɥѡɥɼͱ$݅ɐѼͥѡ́ͱ)=ٕȁѥ ɱͽ́مЁ̸Q́ȁݽɬݽɭЁͽѡ́$)ɥݱѡɽ՝ɥѡمɥ́́䁉́ݡ$݅́ t)ɽȰ͕مѥѡɕձ̰ɥɽ͕͕́ѡݽɬ)͍ͥ́ݥѠ̸eЁٕɔəհ͡ձݥȁɕͥ䁅ЁI ɱ́͡Ёͽ䁥ѕɕѕѡ͔͡ѼѕɄͥͽɅٕѼ5ф5)ѕ́ȁɕѥٔх̰͡ͱ̰ȁ́ɔ!афѼͽɔɽ̸1䁍Ʌѥ̰ѡɥ)єȁ䁽ݽɬḾͥ)́͡ͅѕѡЁɥѥѕȵͽᡥ䁽ɕݽɭ́ѡЁݥѠѡɍ̴ѥ9 ɱͽ)ȁхѥͥЁ́ѕ䁅հѡ́݅ɐѼѡȁɥѡЁͽݡЁѡѥхɕѥ͡ѡЁ́ݕѡхѥݥѠͽɥЁl((((0