Clay Times Back Issues Vol. 21 Issue 99 - Winter/Spring 2015 - Page 40

Leanna Carlson’s Angel Clay BY PAUL LEATHERS Caption 10½" x 10½" x 8". Carlson intends for her “Angel Clay” forms to capture nature’s designs from the wood-fire process. CLAYTIMES·COM n WINTER / SPRING 2015 Leanna Carlson (pictured above) grew up in Prince George, BC, a part of Canada rich with clay and potters. Her family even sold locally-made pottery in their corner store, which was where Carlson bought the very first piece of her collection: a pot she still owns, made by Denman Island’s Beardsley Pottery. Carlson fondly recalls her first encounter with clay, back in the 6th grade. Making four ceramic faces, she explored a different technique and texture on each one, and remembers loving the color and plasticity of the clay. Yet it wasn’t until age 29 that, while working as a computer programmer in Dawson Creek, Carlson took a night class in ceramics and realized that clay was her life’s passion. She was so fascinated, she became librarian of the local potters’ guild so she could access their archives of clay publications. The active lifestyle and potential of ceramic materials interest Carlson the most. While raising her two daughters in Pine Pass, BC she merged her love of the outdoors into dual careers: she worked as a certified ski/snowboard instructor in the winter, and traveled to dig clay and minerals as far away as Mount St. Helens, Washington, during the summer months. Primarily a thrower and wood-firer these days, Carlson remains interested in pursuing her materially-based relationship with clay. In 2006, Carlson was introduced by her friend, Jack Angel, to a local clay deposit, which had drawn limited commercial interest since the early 1900s. In the 1940s, the deposit had been tested regarding its working properties and industrial viability. It was determined that this deposit 40 Leanna Carlson’s Angel Clay CLAYTIMES·COM n WINTER / SPRING 2015 BY PAUL LEATHERS 40 Leanna Carlson (pictured above) grew up in Prince George, BC, a part of Canada rich with clay and potters. Her family even sold locally-made pottery in their corner store, which was where Carlson bought the very first piece of her collection: a pot she still owns, made by Denman Island’s Beardsley Pottery. Yet it wasn’t until age 29 that, while working as a computer programmer in Dawson Creek, Carlson took a night class in ceramics and realized that clay was her life’s passion. She was so fascinated, she became librarian of the local potters’ guild so she could access their archives of clay publications. Carlson fondly recalls her first encounter with clay, back in the 6th grade. Making four ceramic faces, she explored a different technique and texture on each one, and remembers loving the color and plasticity of the clay. The active lifestyle and potential of ceramic materials interest Carlson the most. While raising her two daughters in Pine Pass, BC she merged her love of the outdoors into dual careers: she worked as a certified ski/snowboard instructor Caption 10½" x 10½" x 8". Carlson intends for her “Angel Clay” forms to capture nature’s designs from the wood-fire process. in the winter, and traveled to dig clay and minerals as far away as Mount St. Helens, Washington, during the summer months. Primarily a thrower and wood-firer these days, Carlson remains interested in pursuing her materially-based relationship with clay. In 2006, Carlson was introduced by her friend, Jack Angel, to a local clay deposit, which had drawn limited commercial interest since the early 1900s. In the 1940s, the deposit had been tested regarding its working properties and industrial viability. It was determined that this deposit