Clay Times Back Issues Vol. 21 Issue 99 - Winter/Spring 2015 - Page 32

CLAYTIMES·COM n WINTER / SPRING 2015 MACON MUST-SEES The Round Building — The principal site of Fired Works at historic Central City Park. Originally built in 1871, then reconstructed after a 1904 fire, it has been painstakingly restored to its original beauty, serving as the perfect backdrop for the annual show and sale of more than 6,000 pieces of pottery. Lights on Macon Illumination Tour — Take a stroll down the block with a local host to see a few of the neighborhood’s antebellum mansions in a different light. www.lightsonmacon.com The 1842 Inn — Soak up the ambience of Macon’s only fourstar, four-diamond luxury inn with hors d’oeuvres and a glass of wine or cocktail, and lively conversation with other guests. http://www.1842inn.com Downtown Grill — Tucked into one of downtown Macon’s historic alleys and best known for its delectable selection of steak, fresh fish, and lamb entrees, Downtown Grill is a favorite among locals and visitors to Macon. http://www.macondown towngrill.com Georgia Bob’s Barbecue — A local favorite that happens to be near I-75, garnering “favorite” status by travelers from near and far. “Georgia Bob’s prepares barbeque and food products today as it has been done in the South for over 150 years.” http://georgiabobs.com Tic Toc Room — Enjoy dinner and conversation at the downtown hip, historic Tic Toc Room, where Little Richard performed in his early years. http://hot platesrestaurantgroup.com Fired Works, continued from previous page the very popular “Cocktails and Clay” workshops for adults. Artist talks, pottery demonstrations, plus “Pottery Roadshow” appraisals are also planned. Live music and food at Central City Park are also in store with “Pickin’ & Pottery” (dates to be determined). Tickets are just $5 each. As in the past, Fired Works continues its successful partnership with nearby Ocmulgee National Monument by arranging special tours and activities there during the ten-day 2015 celebration. The goal: to expand awareness of the Ocmulgee River region’s connection to pottery making. Archaeological ceramic evidence has revealed more than 15,000 years of continuous human habitation there. Featured exhibits at the monument will focus on folk pottery and its place in the history and culture of the Southeast. Featured Folk Potters for 2015 Event Clint Alderman began making pottery coil building and pit-firing in 1995. By 1999 he had built a woodfiring kiln and was making traditional folk pottery under the guidance of Edwin Meaders and Michael Crocker. He established a new shop and kiln in Habersham County in 2009, where he currently resides. His works are among the collections of the Folk Pottery Museum of Northeast Georgia and the Atlanta History Center. Bruce Bley has had a lifelong interest in pottery. His work is inspired by the sights and scenery near his home in the North Georgia mountains. He loves crafting pottery because it recalibrates that focus in his life. Each piece is more than just a mug or bowl, he says; each piece embodies a time, a place, and an emotion. Roger Corn, of Lula, GA, is known for his amazing skills in the technique of pulling up his clay. He can create a piece of pottery by using a very small amount of clay, making the piece seem light as a feather. He is also known to fire his pieces several times to achieve the beautiful colored glazes that adorn his pieces. Wayne Hewell is a 5th generation potter. His father, Carl, and grandfather, Maryland (Bud) Hewell were traditional folk potters. A wood-fire potter also living in Lula, Wayne has been potting for more than 31 years. His work is enhanced by surface treatments including Albany slip, red and blue glazes, and good ole’ Southern tobacco spit! Steve Turpin has been a potter for more than 30 years. For Steve, every piece of pottery he creates includes some aspect of his personality; so when someone appreciates that enough to want to buy his pots, he feels a personal connection is made. “To me, that’s what it’s all about,” says Steve. Informative Web Links A wealth of additional information about Fired Works and participating artists, the Macon Arts Alliance, and what to see and do while you’re visiting Macon can be found at the following Websites: Macon Arts Alliance — www.maconarts.org Fired Works — www.firedworksmacon.com Fired Works Preview Party — http://firedworksmacon.com/preview-party.cms Fired Works YouTube Link — www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2_nCrweJmk Macon Convention & Visitors Bureau Link — www.maconga.org Editor’s Note: This article was made possible by the contributions of Ruth Sykes, Director of Media Relations at Laurie Rowe Communications; Jan Beeland, Director of the Macon Arts Alliance (MAA); Heatherly Wakefield, Fired Works Curator and MAA Director of Fine Art; Jonathan Dye, MAA Director of Communications; Jim David, Superintendant of Ocmulgee National Monument; and Kathy Hoskins, founding Fired Works board member. Thanks to all for their input and hospitality! 32 MACON MUST-SEES The Round Building — The principal site of Fired Works at historic Central City Park. Originally built in 1871, then reconstructed after a 1904 fire, it has been painstakingly restored to its original beauty, serving as the perfect backdrop for the annual show and sale of more than 6,000 pieces of pottery. Lights on Macon Illumination Tour — Take a stroll down the block with a local host to see a few of the neighborhood’s antebellum mansions in a different light. www.lightsonmacon.com The 1842 Inn — Soak up the ambience of Macon’s only fourstar, four-diamond luxury inn with hors d’oeuvres and a glass of wine or cocktail, and lively conversation with other guests. http://www.1842inn.com CLAYTIMES·COM n WINTER / SPRING 2015 Downtown Grill — Tucked into one of downtown Macon’s historic alleys and best known for its delectable selection of steak, fresh fish, and lamb entrees, Downtown Grill is a favorite among locals and visitors to Macon. http://www.macondown towngrill.com 32 Georgia Bob’s Barbecue — A local favorite that happens to be near I-75, garnering “favorite” status by travelers from near and far. “Georgia Bob’s prepares barbeque and food products today as it has been done in the South for over 150 years.” http://georgiabobs.com Tic Toc Room — Enjoy dinner and conversation at the downtown hip, historic Tic Toc Room, where Little Richard performed in his early years. http://hot platesrestaurantgroup.com Fired Works, continued from previous page the very popular “Cocktails and Clay” workshops for adults. Artist talks, pottery demonstrations, plus “Pottery Roadshow” appraisals are also planned. Live music and food at Central City Park are also in store with “Pickin’ & Pottery” (dates to be determined). Tickets are just $5 each. As in the past, Fired Works continues its successful partnership with nearby Ocmulgee National Monument by arranging special tours and activities there during the ten-day 2015 celebration. The goal: to expand awareness of the Ocmulgee River region’s connection to pottery making. Archaeological ceramic evidence has revealed more than 15,000 years of continuous human habitation there. Featured exhibits at the monument will focus on folk pottery and its place in the history and culture of the Southeast. Featured Folk Potters for 2015 Event Clint Alderman began making pottery coil building and pit-firing in 1995. By 1999 he had built a woodfiring kiln and was making traditional folk pottery under the guidance of Edwin Meaders and Michael Crocker. He established a new shop and kiln in Habersham County in 2009, where he currently resides. His works are among the collections of the Folk Pottery Museum of Northeast Georgia and the Atlanta History Center. Bruce Bley has had a lifelong interest in pottery. His work is inspired by the sights and scenery near his home in the North Georgia mountains. He loves crafting pottery because it recalibrates that focus in his life. Each piece is more than just a mug or bowl, he says; each piece embodies a time, a place, and an emotion. Roger Corn, of Lula, GA, is known for his amazing skills in the technique of pulling up his clay. He can create a piece of pottery by using a very small amount of clay, making the piece seem light as a feather. He is also known to fire his pieces several times to achieve the beautiful colored glazes that adorn his pieces. Wayne Hewell is a 5th generation potter. His father, Carl, and grandfather, Maryland (Bud) Hewell were traditional folk potters. A wood-fire potter also living in Lula, Wayne has been potting for more than 31 years. His work is enhanced by surface treatments including Albany slip, red and blue glazes, and good ole’ Southern tobacco spit! Steve Turpin has been a potter for more than 30 years. For Steve, every piece of pottery he creates includes some aspect of his personality; so when someone appreciates that enough to want to buy his pots, he feels a personal connection is made. “To me, that’s what it’s all about,” says Steve. Informative Web Links A wealth of additional information about Fired Works and participating artists, the Macon Arts Alliance, and what to see and do while you’re visiting Macon can be found at the following Websites: Macon Arts Alliance — www.maconarts.org Fired Works — www.firedworksmacon.com Fired Works Preview Party — http://firedworksmacon.com/preview-party.cms Fired Works YouTube Link — www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2_nCrweJmk Macon Convention & Visitors Bureau Link — www.maconga.org Editor’s Note: This article was made possible by the contributions of Ruth Sykes, Director of Media Relations at Laurie Rowe Communications; Jan Beeland, Director of the Macon Arts Alliance (MAA); Heatherly Wakefield, Fired Works Curator and MAA Director of Fine Art; Jonathan Dye, MAA Director of Communications; Jim David, Superintendant of Ocmulgee National Monument; and Kathy Hoskins, founding Fired Works board member. Thanks to all for their input and hospitality!