Clay Times Back Issues Vol. 21 Issue 99 - Winter/Spring 2015 - Page 27

Fig. 47 Fig. 48 Fig. 49 Fig. 50 Fig. 51 ter molds.] Once the plaster mold is draped, smoothed, and trimmed level at the bottom edge, I let it firm up overnight and remove the nowstiffened clay from the mold. I then position it on the base slab and sew and fill all the seams (Figs. 39-43). To make smaller domes, I often use one of my metal or plastic master molds, line it with plastic, jam clay into the mold using pieces of 1" slab, then use the plastic to pull it out immediately and position it on the base slab. This is a very fast way to create high relief. Because these domes are still soft, they can be collapsed in areas and added onto with soft clay in others to rapidly create hollow sculptural forms (Fig. 44). Because they are hollow, the base slab under the dome must also have holes. Sectioning the Arch Because we created the largest arch possible in our small studio, and because the radiused table set-up was specific to this piece, we had to create the work one side at a time (Fig. 45).Once the first side had stiffened, it was sectioned, mapped, and numbered (Fig. 46). We removed it from the tables and began laying out side two. As the two sides are of identical profile, our maps were lettered and numbered to prevent any confusion. These 4 to 6 mil plastic and permanent marker maps are useful throughout the rest of the process. With each section lettered and numbered on the back using a loop tool, it is easy to use the correspondingly numbered map to reassemble the work for glazing and installation. We took our arch maps to the park, spread them out on the ground, and reassembled the two sides right on top of the maps (Figs. 47-Fig. 51). Although the installation of a largescale, high-relief work of handmade ceramics is never a simple chore, mapping a project does make it easier. These brief descriptions constitute the entirety of our techniques for the vast majority of scores of architectural projects we have built. With these basics mastered, you can create architectural ceramics in a small studio using your own personal aesthetic. I don’t have a recipe book, just a few simple ingredients. It’s up to you to cook up your own visual feast. [ To learn more about Peter King and his wife/ceramic partner Xinia Marín, visit peterkingceramics.com CLAYTIMES·COM n WINTER / SPRING 2015 27 Fig. 47 Fig. 48 Fig. 50 Fig. 51 ter molds.] Once the plaster mold is draped, smoothed, and trimmed level at the bottom edge, I let it firm up overnight and remove the nowstiffened clay from the mold. I then position it on the base slab and sew and fill all the seams (Figs. 39-43). identical profile, our maps were lettered and numbered to prevent any confusion. These 4 to 6 mil plastic and permanent marker maps are useful throughout the rest of the process. With each section lettered and numbered on the back using a loop tool, it is easy to use the correspondingly numbered map to reassemble the work for glazing and installation. We took our arch maps to the park, spread them out on the ground, and reassembled the two sides right on top of the maps (Figs. 47-Fig. 51). To make smaller domes, I often use one of my metal or plastic master molds, line it with plastic, jam clay into the mold using pieces of 1" slab, then use the plastic to pull it out immediately and position it on the base slab. This is a very fast way to create high relief. Because these domes are still soft, they can be collapsed in areas and added onto with soft clay in others to rapidly create hollow sculptural forms (Fig. 44). Because they are hollow, the base slab under the dome must also have holes. Sectioning the Arch Although the installation of a largescale, high-relief work of handmade ceramics is never a simple chore, mapping a project does make it easier. These brief descriptions constitute the entirety of our techniques for the vast majority of scores of architectural projects we have built. With these basics mastered, you can create architectural ceramics in a small studio using your own personal aesthetic. I don’t have a recipe book, just a few simple ingredients. It’s up to you to cook up your own visual feast. [ To learn more about Peter King and his wife/ceramic partner Xinia Marín, visit peterkingceramics.com CLAYTIMES·COM n WINTER / SPRING 2015 Because we created the largest arch possible in our small studio, and because the radiused table set-up was specific to this piece, we had to create the work one side at a time (Fig. 45).Once the first side had stiffened, it was sectioned, mapped, and numbered (Fig. 46). We removed it from the tables and began laying out side two. As the two sides are of Fig. 49 27