Clay Times Back Issues Vol. 21 Issue 99 - Winter/Spring 2015 - Page 26

Building the Gulf Breeze Arch (continued from previous page) Fig. 35 Fig. 36 Fig. 37 Fig. 38 Fig. 39 Fig. 40 Fig. 41 Fig. 42 Fig. 43 Fig. 44 Fig. 45 Fig. 46 CLAYTIMES·COM n WINTER / SPRING 2015 Then, I resorted to the ancient technique of sprigging press-molded relief designs onto my basic architectural structure. In the years since, this has served me well for a great number of commissions with a wide array of ornamental styles. We wanted the Gulf Breeze Arch to reference the area’s prehistory. We already had tile molds with Pre- Columbian pottery border designs we had made for a previous commission. (We keep copies of all of our original molds.) We employed one of these “Weedon Island” designs to create a border for one side of the arch and a piece of pottery buried in the roots of the “Naval” live oak. To make this border surface, we built walls as previously described and, instead of making a capping slab, pressed out tiles from the “Weedon Island” molds and sprigged them onto our base walls (Fig. 34, previous page). These were then sewn and filled. This continuously repeating design gives verticality to one side of the arch (Figs. 35-38). Drapes and Slumps To create the sun and moon along with some of the wave forms for the arch, we used both drape and slump molds. This tried-and-true technique is great for architectural ceramic relief. I first used drape molds in the early ’70s to produce one of my basic items, bathroom sinks, but have since used them in many different ways to create relief for architectural projects. For the larger domes (sun and moon), we used my hemispheric plaster sink molds. I have slowly gathered a collection of hemispheric master molds with sizes from ½" to 36" in diameter. [Note: If you start looking for true hemispheres you will find them everywhere: from lamp shades to terrariums, they all make great masters. Yard sales and flea markets are great for finding exceptional mas- 26 Building the Gulf Breeze Arch (continued from previous page) Fig. 35 Fig. 36 Fig. 37 Fig. 38 Fig. 39 Fig. 40 Fig. 41 Fig. 42 Fig. 43 Fig. 44 Fig. 45 Fig. 46 of the “Naval” live oak. To make this border surface, we built walls as previously described and, instead of making a capping slab, pressed out tiles from the “Weedon Island” molds and sprigged them onto our base walls (Fig. 34, previous page). These were then sewn and filled. This continuously repeating design gives verticality to one side of the arch (Figs. 35-38). is great for architectural ceramic relief. I first used drape molds in the early ’70s to produce one of my basic items, bathroom sinks, but have since used them in many different ways to create relief for architectural projects. CLAYTIMES·COM n WINTER / SPRING 2015 Then, I resorted to the ancient technique of sprigging press-molded relief designs onto my basic architectural structure. In the years since, this has served me well for a great number of commissions with a wide array of ornamental styles. 26 We wanted the Gulf Breeze Arch to reference the area’s prehistory. We already had tile molds with PreColumbian pottery border designs we had made for a previous commission. (We keep copies of all of our original molds.) We employed one of these “Weedon Island” designs to create a border for one side of the arch and a piece of pottery buried in the roots Drapes and Slumps To create the sun and moon along with some of the wave forms for the arch, we used both drape and slump molds. This tried-and-true technique For the larger domes (sun and moon), we used my hemispheric plaster sink molds. I have slowly gathered a collection of hemispheric master molds with sizes from ½" to 36" in diameter. [Note: If you start looking for true hemispheres you will find them everywhere: from lamp shades to terrariums, they all make great masters. Yard sales and flea markets are great for finding exceptional mas-