Clay Times Back Issues Vol. 21 Issue 99 - Winter/Spring 2015 - Page 23

“Progress fuels motivation, so it’s priming the pump.” Do be realistic about how much you can get done in a defined amount of time. Don’t undermine yourself by expecting to get a huge amount done in a short time. Perfectionism, or no breaks, or no rewards, or extreme expectations, undermine your progress. Instead, reward your progress with short, fun, positive, or constructive “little celebration” rewards. procrastination of doing one more tertiary job, or reading another e-mail. In a typical day, I would hope to start with the most difficult thing, and by the afternoon, do the easier things.) ✔ 5. Learn from other people’s successful strategies. The Website: http://www.lifehack. org/articles/productivity/overcomeprocrastination-once-and-for-all.html offers many suggestions. sort of cringed and wondered if this was the beginning of an arrogant man talking, but he followed up with, “I have had a lot more failure than you!”) • Don’t work to a frazzled or exhausted version of yourself. Rest or take breaks when needed. • If you seem terribly stuck, get help. Have someone look at your pots, or even send images of your work to a clay friend and discuss your work with him/her on the phone or via e-mail. Maybe plan to take a one- Perspectives I Beneath the Surface ✔ 2. Review why you are doing the task. Why did you choose to do this? Does it help your personal or professional life? Coach yourself into being inspired to get on with it. ✔ 3. Do the most difficult job when your willpower and energy are high. (One artist I interviewed works best at night. I work best in the morning.) Figure out when you work best, and do the hard tasks at your peak time. Help yourself out here by getting enough sleep (I improved dramatically one time by going to bed extra early. I was much better at tackling the writing the next day.) Eat healthy food, exercise, and take breaks. ✔ 4. Make a daily plan. (It helps me to have one to three of the day’s most important tasks uppermost in my mind. That prevents the wandering “Perfectionism, or no breaks, or no rewards, or extreme expectations, undermine your progress ...” Here are a few of my favorites: • The bigger motivation picture involves looking at your whole life. What do you want out of life? Take about half an hour to write down all your goals in the following areas: career, education, relationships, money, health, spiritual, and leisure. Next, choose only ten of the areas you have selected. Now squish it down to five and try to get down to three. • This next step seems harsh, but stick with me here: Delete from your to-do list anything that doesn’t relate to your top three to five goals. • Remember, failure is really just a learning experience. (I recall my favorite story about a famous fiber artist. He was speaking to a packed audience. At the opening of the presentation, he leaned into the microphone and asked, “Do you know the difference between you and me?” The audience or two-week course at a great art camp for adults! Lo and behold—a Website for artists worth checking out: http://skinnyartist.com/5-strategiesartists-can-use-to-overcomeprocrastination/ Now for the “game” part of this column: First, choose the procrastination solutions that would make the most sense for each person’s interview. Next, choose the solutions that would help you the most. Select just one or two for starters. [ In the spirit of full disclosure, Lana serves on the board of Penland School and shows her work at Schaller Gallery. Lana Wilson may be reached at lana@lanawilson.com. Her Website for workshop info. and images is www. lanawilson.com. CLAYTIMES·COM n WINTER / SPRING 2015 23 Do be realistic about how much you can get done in a defined amount of time. Don’t undermine yourself by expecting to get a huge amount done in a short time. Perfectionism, or no breaks, or no rewards, or extreme expectations, undermine your progress. Instead, reward your progress with short, fun, positive, or constructive “little celebration” rewards. ✔ 2. Review why you are doing the task. Why did you choose to do this? Does it help your personal or professional life? Coach yourself into being inspired to get on with it. ✔ 3. Do the most difficult job when your willpower and energy are high. (One artist I interviewed works best at night. I work best in the morning.) ✔ 4. Make a daily plan. (It helps me to have one to three of the day’s most important tasks uppermost in my mind. That prevents the wandering ✔ 5. Learn from other people’s successful strategies. The Website: http://www.lifehack. org/articles/productivity/overcomeprocrastination-once-and-for-all.html offers