Clay Times Back Issues Vol. 21 Issue 99 - Winter/Spring 2015 - Page 22

Perspectives I Beneath the Surface Procrastination, cont. Now I am solving some of my procrastination issues by hiring the right people. If they are good employees I have to get things done so they can do their part to help me out. So I hire people who excel in abilities that I don’t have. We all sort of know what we aren’t good at ... if you are an introvert, then hire an extrovert who can handle sales and talking. The tasks now are getting physical space to look better and retooling the Website and stationery in font and colors. I am not good at doing all of that so I am going to talk to my Website company and they will review it and come back to me with solutions. What happens to me with procrastination is that I am so interested in what is next with my gallery that I procrastinate at collecting on old bills. Procrastination is not my worst disease. There are galleries that have closed because owners were procrastinators or poor business people, or because it is a hard business to be a clay gallery. I don’t waver and I chose a path and I have stayed on it. I stick with artists I like. Here is where I really procrastinate: my own life. I have talked about it with older successful people, and they all say they wished they had lived more and had more fun.” Now here is the Website where you can learn about Jerry Seinfeld’s technique to solve procrastination: http://lifehacker.com/281626/jerryseinfelds-productivity-secret It’s fun and worth reading. If you want more details, see http://lifehacker.com/5886128/howseinfelds-productivity-secret-fixed-myprocrastination-problem Following is a summary of solutions I’ve compiled from many different Websites, with my own comments (in parentheses). Much of this information is derived from: fluentbrain.com/blog/13-effectivesolutions-to-procrastination/ ✔ 1. Start with the “Small Edible Chunks” theory. Strong and repeated advice says to not look at the huge job and tackle it; instead, break it down into edible, doable, small steps. If you do one small step, it helps you to do another. Tim Pychyl of Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada, who wrote The Procrastinator’s Digest, says, Olympic FL12E Inside dimensions 24” x 24” x 36”, 12 cu. ft., fires to 2350°F – Cone 10, 12 key controller with cone fire & ramp hold programming, 240-208 volt, single phase. $5710 For less than $6,000, you could be firing a 12 cubic foot, cone 10 gas or electric kiln. More value for your dollar, more bang for your buck! CLAYTIMES·COM n WINTER / SPRING 2015 * Pictured with optional stainless steel vent hood Olympic DD9 with Vent Hood* – Inside dimensions 30” x 25” x 25”, inside volume 15 cu. ft., setting area 23” x 23” x 30”, 9.2 cu. ft., fires to 2350°F – Cone 10, propane or natural gas $5870 Contact an Olympic Kilns Distributor to purchase an Olympic Gas or Electric Kiln www.greatkilns.com Phone 800.241.4400 or 770.967.4009 Fax 770.967.1196 22 Perspectives I Beneath the Surface Procrastination, cont. Now I am solving some of my procrastination issues by hiring the right people. If they are good employees I have to get things done so they can do their part to help me out. So I hire people who excel in abilities that I don’t have. We all sort of know what we aren’t good at ... if you are an introvert, then hire an extrovert who can handle sales and talking. The tasks now are getting physical space to look better and retooling the Website and stationery in font and colors. I am not good at doing all of that so I am going to talk to my Website company and they will review it and come back to me with solutions. What happens to me with procrastination is that I am so interested in what is next with my gallery that I procrastinate at collecting on old bills. Procrastination is not my worst disease. There are galleries that have closed because owners were procrastinators or poor business people, or because it is a hard business to be a clay gallery. I don’t waver and I chose a path and I have stayed on it. I stick with artists I like. Here is where I really procrastinate: my own life. I have talked about it with older successful people, and they all say they wished they had lived more and had more fun.” Now here is the Website where you can learn about Jerry Seinfeld’s technique to solve procrastination: http://lifehacker.com/281626/jerryseinfelds-productivity-secret ­It’s fun and worth reading. If you want more details, see http://lifehacker.com/5886128/howseinfelds-productivity-secret-fixed-myprocrastination-problem CLAYTIMES·COM n WINTER / SPRING 2015 Olympic FL12E Inside dimensions 24” x 24” x 36”, 12 cu. ft., fires to 2350°F – Cone 10, 12 key controller with cone fire & ramp hold programming, 240-208 volt, single phase. $5710 22 Olympic DD9 with Vent Hood* – Inside dimensions 30” x 25” x 25”, inside volume 15 cu. ft., setting area 23” x 23” x 30”, 9.2 cu. ft., fires to 2350°F – Cone 10, propane or natural gas $5870 * Pictured with optional stainless steel vent hood Following is a summary of solutions I’ve compiled from many different Websites, with my own comments (in parentheses). Much of this information is derived from: fluentbrain.com/blog/13-effectivesolutions-to-procrastination/ ✔ 1. Start with the “Small Edible Chunks” theory. Strong and repeated advice says to not look at the huge job and tackle it; instead, break it down into edible, doable, small steps. If you do one small step, it helps you to do another. Tim Pychyl of Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada, who wrote The Procrastinator’s Digest, says, For less than $6,000, you could be firing a 12 cubic foot, cone 10 gas or electric kiln. More value for your dollar, more bang for your buck! Contact an Olympic Kilns Distributor to purchase an Olympic Gas or Electric Kiln www.greatkilns.com Phone 800.241.4400 or 770.967.4009 Fax 770.967.1196