Canadian Musician - January / February - Page 17

The Great Escape Accepting Artist Submissions The Great Escape festival is now accepting artist showcase submissions for 2018. Held in Brighton, U.K., The Great Escape will be held from May 17-19, 2018. The Great Escape new music festival showcases 450 emerging artists from all over the world in 30-plus walkable venues across the city. The sub- mission deadline is Feb. 12, 2018 and there is no submission fee. For more information, go to www.greatescapefestival.com. … The International Confederation of Societies of Authors and Composers (CISAC) released its 2017 Global Collections Report, which highlights some positive trends worldwide in royalty collections for creators. Global collections are up six per cent to just under $10.1 billion USD. For music, royalties are up seven per cent to $8.9 billion. Global collections have risen for three years in a row and are up 19 per cent from 2012. Digital collections rose 51 per cent, driven largely by streaming subscription services, but digital is still held back by poor returns, in particular from video streaming services. The biggest collections market is the U.S. with $1.95 billion. Canada places 10 th with $258.5 million in collections, up 1.5 per cent year-over-year. www.cisac.org. Music Canada Live Skeptical of Ontario’s Ticket Scalping Law On Dec. 13, 2017 the Government of Ontario voted to pass the Ticket Sales Act as part of a larger consumer protection bill. The government says the new laws will protect music and sports fans by giving them fairer access to event tickets. Among other changes, the law makes it illegal to use ticket buying technology (often called “bots”) to buy up large groups of tickets, and also caps the resale price of tickets at 50 per cent over face value. Industry association Music Canada Live, led by Executive Director Erin Benjamin, says that banning bot technology is a “step in the right direction,” but raises concerns about a ticket resale price cap. “Several years ago, the [formerly known as] Ticket Legislation Act was revised to remove caps because they failed to prevent tickets being sold above face value. Ontario has been here before. Regulating the price of tickets will once again drive illegal and fraudulent activity deeper into the dark corners of the internet, and will not protect fans. Concert goers will pay more for tickets and have less certainty that those tickets will be real. It will be difficult, if not impossible, to enforce and will encourage more out-of-jurisdiction, and increased illegal, resale activity. It is unclear how this time will be different.” W W W. C A N A D I A N M U S I C I A N . CO M C A N A D I A N M U S I C I A N • 17 MARK YOUR calendar...