BirdLife: The Magazine September 2017 - Page 66

VOLUME 27 ISSUE 3 YOU CAN FIND OUR PRODUCTS AT EXCLUSIVE SPECIALIST RETAILERS AND ONLINE AT WWW.SWAROVSKIOPTIK.COM SEPTEMBER 2017 ISSN: 0959-2709 Bird Conservation International cambridge.org/bci BY APPOINTMENT TO HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II SWAROVSKI OPTIK SUPPLIER OF BINOCULARS Habitat requirements of the spectacular Green Peafowl revealed The majestic Green Peafowl Pavo muticus, found in Southeast Asia, has undergone a catastrophic decline due to hunting and habitat loss, and is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List. The species is now largely confined to protected areas, so the effective manage- ment of these sites is crucial for its survival. To find out exactly what management the birds need, Niti Sukumal and colleagues studied the Green Peafowl in Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary, western Thailand. By using surveys, camera trapping and radio tracking, the team have detailed the exact hab- itats used by the birds throughout the year, and shown the benefits of reducing human disturbance. Junín Rail threatened by grazing and hydroelectricity Published for BirdLife International by Cambridge University Press INTRODUCTION As explored on page 28, the Yellow Sea region is of high global importance for waterbird populations. This issue of BCI contains the results of recent bird surveys by Guy Anderson and colleagues, revealing that the southern Jiangsu coast in eastern China is the most important migratory stopover area in the world, in both spring and autumn, for two globally threatened species — Spoon- billed Sandpiper Calidris pygmaea (Critically Endangered; peak count: 62 in spring 2015 and 225 in autumn 2014) and Spotted Greenshank Tringa guttifer (Endan- gered; peak count: 210 in spring 2014 and 1,110 in autumn 2015). The study also uncovered several serious and acute threats in this area, the most pressing of which is large-scale land claims, which threaten to destroy critically important intertidal mudflat habitats. Other threats identified include the spread of invasive Spartina (flooding may be one solution — see page 28), chemical pollution and the mor- tality of waterbirds by entrapment in nets. It is clear that the rapid establishment of effective protected areas within the study area is required to secure the future of the globally threatened waterbirds using the East Asian Australasian Flyway. The Endangered Junín Rail Later- allus tuerosi is found only in the marshland around one lake, Lago de Junín, in the Andean highlands of Peru. Lars Dinesen and col- leagues have surveyed the species and studied its habitat preferences. Their results indicate that it has specific habitat requirements, being found only in vegetation at least 0.5 m tall and in the marshy edge on muddy ground with less than 20 cm of water. They con- clude that although the population appears to be larger than previ- ously thought, the species remains at grave threat from grazing by sheep and cattle, and from water level fluctuations accentuated by regulation for hydroelectric power. ALSO IN THIS ISSUE The intertidal wetlands of southern Jiangsu Province, China — globally important for Spoon-billed Sandpipers and other threatened waterbirds, but facing multiple serious threats › Estimating conservation metrics from atlas data: the case of southern African endemic birds › Atlas data indicates forest dependent bird species declines in South Africa › Diet selection by wintering Lesser White-fronted Goose Anser erythropus and the role of food availability › Migration patterns and seasonal forest use by birds in the Brazilian Pantanal › A multi-scale analysis of habitat selection in peripheral populations of the endangered Dupont’s Lark Chersophilus duponti › Testing for errors in estimating bird mortality rates at wind farms and power lines › Assessing the impact of mowing on Common Redshanks Tringa totanus breeding on salt marshes: lessons for conservation management. If you wish to subscribe to the journal, please visit www.cambridge.org/bci/subscribe BTX #CLOSER 2 NATURE The new binocular BTX spotting scope offers the most natural viewing experience ever, allowing you to see the action more closely with both eyes, crystal clear in every detail, and ensuring your comfort for hours on end with an innovative forehead support and angled view. Enjoy moments even more – with SWAROVSKI OPTIK. SEE THE UNSEEN WWW.SWAROVSKIOPTIK.COM