Best Places to Work - The Journal Record 2018 - Page 60

#22 Small/Medium Employer Website: okcic.com Twitter Handle: @OKCIndianClinic U.S. Corporate Headquarters: Oklahoma City Industry: Nonprofit – Health & Human Services Status: Nonprofit U.S. Employees: 187 Oklahoma Employees: 187 Year Founded: 1974 Company Leader: Robyn Sunday-Allen, CEO A s a medical facility, Oklahoma City Indian Clinic offers its pa- tients numerous wellness programs and classes to keep them healthy and engaged. The clinic extends those efforts to its employees. Employees can work out during the day, meet with personal trainers and nutritionists and participate in competitions for prizes covering health and weight loss. On-site health screenings offer cash prizes for healthy outcomes, and a “Get SET” program includes cook- ing, nutrition and workout classes on-site, such as Zumba or strength training. Clinic Culture Nights are open to employees, patients and the community. They emphasize Native American cultural identity and traditions such as beading, painting and basket weaving. The clinic also pays 100 percent of medical premiums for each employee, as well as 100 percent of the premiums for their spouses and children. “I think it’s a great place to work because of our passion for our patients and the culture – of the family environment atmosphere,” said Monica Tippit, OKCIC’s chief human resources officer. Oklahoma City Indian Clinic, originally incorporated in 1974 as the Central Oklahoma American Indian Health Council, serves more than 19,000 American Indians from more than 220 different tribes and is 60 2018 Best Places to Work one of two urban Indian health clinics in the state. Oklahoma ranks second in the nation for its American Indian population. For its patients, which include many employees, OKCIC services include medical, dental, pharmacy, behavioral health, diabetes, public health, fitness, nutrition and other family programs. The clinic’s core values include quality, integrity, professionalism and putting people first, which includes patients and its employees. Employees highlighted in a survey that they love the benefits, the generous paid time off ranging from 15 to 42 days and a supportive team atmosphere that encourages new ideas, quality improvement and growth personally and professionally. The clinic hosts af- ter-school and summer programs for school-aged children, employ- ees and the community it serves. Other perks for employees include team-building events, contests and a floating employee appreciation fun day each year with food, games and giveaways. The all-staff, off-site retreat once a year includes a motivational speaker and team-building exercises. “Oklahoma City Indian Clinic has grown a lot in the last few years,” Tippet said. “It’s just exciting that we’re growing so fast and the leadership is still working on maintaining that family atmosphere.” The Journal Record